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Throwers often go under the radar, but Rachel Lee Wilson is firmly in the spotlight

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Over the past few years, senior thrower Rachel Lee Will, according to reports.The Spaniard has featured in all eight Premier League games since joining the Gunners on a season-long loan.Ceballos hinted this week that he would be open to leaving Real Madrid for Arsenal on a permanent basis.However, Real son has become one of the most dominant athletes in Penn track. The numbers don’t lie: Wilson currentlyetiah is playing his way into Arsenal manager Unai Emery’s new season plans.The Sun says Nketiah, 20, was due to join Bristol City on-loan.But Emery may keep him around after an impressive pre-season goals against Bayern and Fiorentina.Freddie Ljungb holds the program record in the outdoor hammer throw (63.89 meters) and the indoor weight throw (20.53m). These numbers secured her a second consecutive title in the Ivy League Indoor Heptagonal Championships earlier this season.

But unlike most student-athletes, Wilson did not compete in these sports during high school, since the hammer throw is not offered as a high school sport in any state except Rhode Island. Instead, her main events were the discus and the shot put, while she would only practice the hammer throw during the summer with her father, who was also a thrower in high school.

“I applied to Penn, and I contacted the coach at the time and I asked if he had any spots on the team, because my numbers were decent, but they weren’t good enough to get recruited,” Wilson said. “He didn’t have any girls recruited that year, so it ended up working out. Once I got here, I started to get more serious with the hammer and now that’s my main event.”

After joining the team in 2015, Wilson quickly started to impress. During her first season as a Quaker, Wilson recorded 21 top-10 performances between the two events and set the school record in the weight throw at Indoor Heps, placing third. She was also named the team’s most valuable player of the freshman class. From then on, the now-senior has held the weight throw program record and keeps extending it each year.

In her junior year, Wilson really stood out, winning six meets in the weight throw, including an individual indoor Ivy Heps title. She successfully defended her title this year when she became the first Penn athlete ever to crack the 20m mark in the weight throw.

In the hammer throw, Wilson has been just as unstoppable. After being named to the second team All-Ivy list in 2017, the thrower came back even stronger and collected an outdoor Ivy Heps title. Furthermore, she also received an honorable mention after a in the NCAA Outdoor Championships.

But the secret for Wilson’s success during her time at Penn does not come from any pre-meet rituals or superstitions. In fact, Wilson credits her accomplishments to her time management skills and hard-work.

“She had already achieved so many things, but after having a phenomenal junior year, she further dedicated herself, trying to get to the next level,” throwing coach Jeff Pflaumbaum said. “It’s amazing to see how she can excel in both academics and athletics, especially in an Ivy League school. This dedication makes her a leader; she’s always trying to push the group forward.”

Despite being ranked No. 111 in the world, Wilson does not plan to continue her career in track. After graduation, she has plans to move to Michigan and work as an engineer, but for now, the senior still has higic says the players know their Champions League hopes are on a knife-edge after their 4-4 thriller with Ajax.The result, coupled with Valencia’s 4-1 victory over Lille, leaves Group H incredibly tight, with three teams at the top on seven points. Cheh hopes for the end of the season.

“After NCAAs last year, I wasn’t really happy with my performance, and I really didn’t want it to happen again,” Wilson said. “My main goals are to make it to the NCAAs again, to set the new Ivy League record for hammer, and to win the Ivy Heps again.”

Penn Relays isn’t famous for its throwing events — they don’t take place at Franklin Field and are in some ways overshadowed by the track events. Fans don’t always know where to go to watch the throwers. If fans were to go to the Mondschein Throwing Complex on Thursday, they’d get a chance to watch a three-time Ivy champion.

Penn wrestling resumes dual meet season with 25-18 comeback loss to Duke

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The winter break grind continues for Penn wrestling.

The Quakers traveled south to Duke this weekend, jumping back into the dual meet season for 2019. Despite a promising start to the match with wins in the 125- and 133-pound weight classes, the Red and Blue ultimately fell by a score of 25-18.

Penn (1-2) opened the meet with a shutout by freshman Carmen Ferrante at 125 pounds. Ferrante secured just over three minutes of riding time by the end of the second period and won the match in a technical fall with a score of 15-0, contributing five team points to the Quakers’ tally.

After Duke (1-0) forfeited the 133-pound match, Penn’s lead li coach Carlo Ancelotti and his players blanked the media after last night’s Champions League draw with RB Salzburg.Ancelotti refused to speak to the media and abandoned his contractually-obligated press conference.It’s also emerged the players are was up to 11. Next, freshman Grant Aronoff faced the first of four brothers competing for Duke this weekend, freshman Josh Finesilver, at 141 pounds. This match, which each respective head coach acknowledged as a key matchup before the meet, allowed Duke to puthe Major League Soccer (MLS) expansion team part-owned by David Beckham, have unveiled a long-term omnichannel retail partnership with apparel and merchandise giant Fanatics, reports, /.The deal will see Fanatics manage all in-venue retail operationt its first four team points on the board as Finesilver won by major decision, 14-6.

Fellow freshman and No. 17 Anthony Artalona faced the next Finesilver brother, redshirt senior and No. 6 Mitch, at 149 pounds. The pair met earlier this season in the semifinals of the the , where Artalona fell 5-2.

With these two top-20 competitors battling it out again this weekend, the low-scoring match saw its fepared to punish Manchester City if they’re found guilty of breaking financial football laws.Reports last week suggested City may face a Champions League ban if found guilty with UEFA referring the case to Club Financial Control Body adjudicatory chairst takedown in the last 45 seconds of the final period by Finesilver. Mitch Finesilver ultimately defeated Artalona 4-1, earning three team points for Duke and cutting Penn’s lead to 11-7.

Senior Joe Oliva, a three-time team captain for the Quakers, competed at 157 pounds. Oliva, who entered the meet with four losses by just two points or fewer this season, finally got over the hump to deliver his first team points of the year, winning a major decision over Benjamin Anderson by a score of 13-5 and pushing Penn’s lead to 15-7.

At 165 pounds, the third Finesilver brother, sophomore Zach, wrestled Penn sophomore Evan DeLuise. The matchup started out close, as DeLuise led after an early takedown and secured over a minute of riding time. DeLuise’s offensive aggression continued as he led going into the final period, repeatedly shooting first and making offensive advances.

However, the Finesilvers improved to 3-0 on the day when Zach earned four back points at the buzzer to erase DeLuise’s riding time, edging ahead 12-8 and trimming Penn’s lead to 15-10.

A victory followed for the fourth Finesilver brother, Matt, who beat junior Brian Krasowski at 174 pounds by technical fall in a 17-1 win which included five minutes and 29 seconds of riding time. At this point, with the meet tied at 15, the Finesilver brothers had contributed all the team points on the board for Duke.

Duke won the two matches, at 184 and 197 pounds by a major decision and a pin, respectively, to add on 10 team points and make the score 25-15 in favor of the home team.

In the last matchup, between freshman Ben Goldin and Duke’s Araad Fisher, Penn won three more team points as Goldin won by a 5-2 decision. However, the Quakers were unable to dig out of their 10-point deficit, and the meet ended with a 25-18 Duke victory.

The Quakers will hope to bounce back from the loss when they face University City foe Drexel on Jan. 13 at the Palestra.

Ivy League rule change reduced risk of concussions in football, journal article reports

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Penn is used to having its name published in prestigious journals. Generally, though, the University only finds itself in the byline, not in the data itself.

On October 1, reported that a rule change in Ivy League football appeared to have reduced head injuries by making kickoff returns less frequent.

“We are proud to see results from our study published in such an esteemed journal as JAMA, and even more gratified to know that policies we put in place have directly led to a decrease in concussions,” Ivy League Executive Director Robin Harris said in a league press release.

Biostatistics and epidemiology professor Douglas J. Wiebe published the article, which details a recent study of data from the past several years of Ivy League football. F boss Jurgen Klopp has laughed off Alisson’s uncharacteristic howler in Wednesday’s 3-1 win over Lyon.The Brazilian allowed a routine cross to drop out of his hands and into the path of Moussa Dembele, with the goalkeeper bringing him down in the boxollowing a rule change prior to the 2016 season, researchers wanted to know if the league had been successful in reducing concussions caused by kickoffs.

According to Wiebe’s article, the rate of touchbacks on kickoffs increased from an average of 17.9 percent before 2016 to 48 percent in the two years after the rule was changed. Per 1000 plays, the rate of concussions during kickoffs decreased from 10.93 before 2016 to 2.04 after. For non-kickoff plays, the rate of concussions was 2.56 before and 1.18 after the rule change.

A difference-in-differences analysis — a statistical method that determines the impact of a ‘treatment’ in an observational study — found that 7.51 fewer concussions per 1000 kickoff plays occurred following the rule change.

The new rule, which moved the spot of the kickoff from the 35 to the 40-yard line, makes it more likely that teams will kick the ball deep into the opposing team’s end zone. Teams will generally choose not to return these kicks for strategic reasons, which results in more touchbacks. The Ivy League predicted that it could reduce the number of head injuries by decreasing the frequency with which players had to engage in dangerous returns.

Kickoff returns are notoriously dangerous; according to the journal article, in 2015 “kickoffs accounted for 6% of all plays but 21% of concussions” in the Ivy League. A rule change that can make them safer could take a significant stride toward increased player safety without disrupting or changing the game itself.

However, it wasn’t obvious that the researchers were going to see promising results. At the same time as they changed the location of the kickoff, the Ivy League also changed the placement of a touchback from the 25 yard to the 20 yard line. This could potentially have encourage teams to take fewer touchbacks in the hopes of getting to start a drive further from their own end zone.

This isn’t all that Penn and the Ivy League have been doing to reduce head injuries. The Ivy League also instituted strict rules eliminating full-contact hits during practice, which the study’s authorsting Manchester United today.Wilson, who is on loan at Eddie Howe’s side from United’s arch-rivals Liverpool , is expecting a hostile reception from the travelling supporters, but claimed he is ready to use it as a motivator.”It’s part and parcel of acknowledge could bear some of the responsibility for the total decrease in concussions.

Penn is leading the Ancient Eight by doing even er their 0-0 draw with Crystal Palace.The former midfielder will return to his post in charge of the Under-23s following the appointment of Nigel Pearson as head coach and his two-game stint ended with a point against Palace.He said, “We knew Crystalmore to reduce concussions. This season, the football and sprint football teams will add an innovative, to their helmets which is supposed to reduce the risk of injury during collisions.

Concussions and the associated long-term health risks that afflict former football players represent a consequence of the game that leagues are increasingly hoping to mitigate. Football leagues have begun to take the view that insufficient player safety, especially with regard to head injuries, threatens the existence of the game of football itself. The Ivy League has been among those at the forefront of this trend, continuing to innovate and make the game safer.

Meet the Super Seniors: Penn volleyball's veterans make the most of their time running the show

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In college athletics, every new season brings plenty of new faces and, more painfully, a host of goodbyes. But this was not the case last season for one Penn team, a rarity which will make the end of this season all the more bittersweet.

The Penn volleyball class of 2017 was a comples not enough for his teammates.The Reds are currently leading the Premier League by eight points after finishing second last season.And Henderson says only more silverware will satisfy his teammates.”At the moment, people can talk about the moment wete non-factor on and off the court. This is not an attack on their playing ability or leadership qualities, but merely a consequence of the fact that they did not exist. After the star-studded class of 2016 with its five captains departed following the 2015 campaign, last year’s team had zero seniors, relying on an extremely young squad for both production and leadership.

While the Quakers struggled on the court last year, the constant refrain around the program was that it was a “two-year team,” and that the 2017 season would be an opportunity to build the learning experience of 2016. This year, the team is once again top-heavy in terms of age, with six seniors leading the way.

Kendall Covington, Sydney Morton, Aimee Stephenson, Michelle Pereira, Emmy Friedler and Hayley Molnar all enter their final season with a full year’s experience of being the elder stateswomen of the team. For all intents and purposes, they’ve been the old kids on the block since before they were even upperclassmen. Gathering before practice one afternoon, they reflect on their journey:

“Sophomore spring [after the seniors played their final game in the fall of 2015] we all had to step up and be leaders,” says Morton, one of three captains along with Covington and junior Taylor Cooper.

“Having been the oldest on the team for two years now, I feel like we seem, really, REALLY old,” Friedler says. “And we’re kind of used to that role, so it doesn’t seem like a shift for us at all.”

“It’s more of a habit now,” Stephenson (or “Steve,” as she is known) says. “I don’t really remember not having been a leader on this team.”

But if you push them hard enough, the senior six can remember their earliest days with the Red and Blue — and even further back than that.

“We remember our official visit,” Morton says, before her teammates reveal that for the setter from Atlanta, the road almost ended there. The seniors recall how Morton was sick (or “deathly ill,” as Molnar puts it) during that first trip to Penn.

“We thought she was really quiet, but she was actually dying the whole time,” Pereira (or “Perry”) says.

The team laughs as they recall Morton wearing sweats in a seemingly 100-degree ice rink. Friedler remembers thinking, “We don’t know her, but she does NOT seem OK,” before the players decided to take their future captain to the hospital.

But things have changed. These six know each other as well as anybody now, and they’ve each grown into their own roles on and off the court. As Pereira explains, “Sydney’s the mom” (“Yeah, you’re very mom-like,” confirms Molnar, who is “the fun one,” but also “very competitive”).

Pereira continues dishing out roles, calling Stephenson the “team therapist.” The senior from San Diego agrees, saying, “people come to me with a lot of personal problems.”

“I feel like K-Cov is the energy provider. She’s the spark. She’s someone we can look to when we need energy or leadership by example, and I feel like Sydney is someone who is really good behind the scenes, good at coordinating things.”

Pereira struggles to give herself a role, ultimately settling on “the chill one.” But her teammates, even the younger ones, have no shortage of things to say about her.

“Perry is very, like, weird in a good way,” star junior Courtney Quinn says with a smile. “If you’re sitting next to Perry at dinner, it’s not going to be a surface-level conversation. Ieturn to PSG.Ginola played 158 games and scored 44 goals for the Parisiens.He told France Bleu, “I see myself returning to PSG? Yes but not today. I’m not telling you today, because things are too complicated and I do not want to go inside it. “I want’s gonna be something weird, and extroverted, and it’s gonna blow your mind.”

Friedler is the smallest in stature, but nobody takes her lightly.

“I would say that I’m probably more of the lay-down-the-hammer type,” the Illinois native says as she makes her fist into her palm.

“Emmy, she’ll tell you how it is. If you want blunt, you really want to know what’s going on, she’ll tell you,” Quinn laughs. “If I want to feel good about how I’m doing, I’ll go to Steve.

“They all have such big personalities that are so unique and fun,” Quinn adds.

But while the seniors (even Friedler) are lighthearted in front of a microphone, they’re dead-serious (even Molnar) on the court, and they provide a massive share of the team’s overall production. With their careers winding down, those around them who are in it for the longer haul know that an era is ending.

“I think from the day I stepped on campus, the ses a massive offer on the table from China.The Mirror says Willian was offered a £17.8m move to Shanghai Greenland Shenhua which could have netter him more than £30m.But the Brazil ace, currently at the Copa America, has now interest in accepting thnior group has had tremendous leadership qualities,” first-year coach Katie Schumacher-Cawley says. “That’s a big group to lose, and I think that each of them is so different, and adds a lot of personality to the team, and it’ll be interesting to see how the team meshes once they’re gone.”

The younger players in particular will need to adjust on and off the court in the absence of the seniors’ production and presence.

“It’s gonna be a big hole to fill. The seniors are the heart of our team. You look up to them,” freshman Parker Jones says.

“We’ve grown up with them,” Quinn says. They’ve been my best friends for three years, I can’t imagine them not being here.”

Even if Quinn and the younger Quakers can’t imagine a Penn volleyball squad without Molnar, Covington, Pereira, Morton, Friedler and Stephenson, they won’t have to for long — it will soon be a harsh reality. But until then, the seniors plan on leaving it all out on the court.

“We only have six to eight weeks left of volleyball, we’re all trying to enjoy it.”

But the seniors know that, even after they take off their uniforms for the final time, Penn volleyball will be a gift that continues to give.

“I learned more life skills being on the team, than I did in the classes I took at Penn,” Stephenson says, to unanimous approval.

Penn women's basketball bonds over trip to Italy

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One of the beautiful things about sports is their universality — you don’t have to speak the same language as your opponents to recognize a fantastic play or a well-fought game. This past August, Penn women’s basketball got to experience this element of sports firsthand during a ten-day whirlwind tour of Italy.

For the first time in program history, the Quakers embarked overseas for what they called the “2014 Italy Tour,” which included stops in Rome, Florence, Lake Como and Venice. The goal? Soak up a little bit of Italian culture while getting international basketball experience.

“[The team] saw some of the most historic venues in the world — the Leaning Tower of Pisa, the Roman Colosseum, the Vatican, the statue of David by Michelangelo,” coach Mike McLaughlin said of the Quaker’s leisure activities. “Things in history that they’ll never forget.”

Beyond just visiting the ‘touristy’ sites, though, the Quakers learned valuable lessons about chemistry and the universality of sports during their brief stint abroad.

“My favorite memory about Italy, more than the sightseeing and traveling, was probably the three games,” senior guard Kathleen Roche said.

During its 2014 Italy Tour, the Quakers played three games against Italian and German semi-professional teams. Penn opened with a 69-39 win over the Italy All-Stars and followed the resounding victory with anothenham defender.The 32 year-old Belgium international comes off contract in June and is yet to seriously discuss new terms with Spurs.Agent Tim de Mul revealed: “We don’t have an agreement at the moment, but I don’t exclude anything. “We consider ever win over AS Vertis La Spezia, 78-49.

Junior guard Brooklyn Juday described playing against these teams as a bonding experience for the Quakers .

“When you’re playing teams that don’t speak your language that’s something that is a little bit difficult to overcome,” she said.

Following their win over La Spezia, the Red and Blue were treated to a five course meal with the members of the Italian team.

“Only two of the girls spoke English, but we were seated every other person with their team members,” Juday recalls. “We had some funny moments with them — and some awkward moments.”

Despite some things lost in translation, McLaughlin regarded the dinner as “the pinnacle” of the trip.

“Their English is limited, our Italian is limited, but you can tell they can communicate over one common bond, which was the game,” he said. “You couldn’t ask for a better environment.”

The language barrier, however, was not the only obstacle the Quakers would face while abroad. With foreign opponents comes an entirely foreign style of play, at times. Penn got a dose of this first hand during its third and final game of the trip, a 62-56 loss to Chemcats Chemnitz of Germany.

“The German team was very brute force, really rough and going right at us,” Roche said.

The Germans’ style of physical play took the Quakers — especially the younger, untested members of the squad — by surprise. Although Penn was not able to pull out a win, it gained valuable experience playing aggressively from buzzer to buzzer.

“We had a chance for some players who haven’t played a whole lot during their tenure hereon for his off-field influence.The Brazilian attacker is one of the most talented wingers in the Premier League.But it is not only his performances that are drawing praise from his manager, as he helped the Blues to a 3-2 win over Wolves in the Premi to play,” McLaughlin said. “I felt that experience in terms of on the court was what really helped move things forward.”

Roche agrees.

“A huge reason for going to Italy was being able to play together, to know how each other plays and to get that groove going before we start our season,” she said.

The Quakers are just days away from their season opener on November 14 against Tennessee in Knoxville, and McLaughlin will be looking to those nine players on his roster with international experience to set the tone for the game.

The Lady Volunteers are perennially one of the most competitive women’s programs in Division I basketball, thus keeping up with Tennessee’s physicir 3-3 draw with Manchester United.The Blades were up 2-0 and all over United before a stunning comeback from the visitors put them ahead, only for Oli McBurnie to equalise at the deathSpeaking after the game, Souness compared Chris Wilder’s side to al style on the court will be an ample challenge for Penn.

But Roche is confident in what her team learned from its loss to Chemcats Chemnitz.

“We’re going to play teams that are really aggressive, so we had to make sure that we don’t let [the Lady Volunteers] beat us up. Especially going into Tennessee,” she said.

“I think that experience in Italy is going to be really beneficial to that.”

Football star and assistant coach Lemonick dies

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Bernie Lemonick, one of the most illustrious players in Penn football history and an assistant coach with the program throughout the late 1950s, has died. The former offensive lineman for the Red and Blue died on Friday morning.

Born in 1928, Lemonick was a dedicated supporter of Penn football both during and after his time with the program. A Wharton graduate in 1951, the Philadelphia native was twice named national lineman of the week throughout his playing career – once in 1949 after a game against Dartmouth and once in 1950 after a matchup with Wisconsin.

Following his senior season with the Quakers, Lemonick was honored in various ways, including being named second-team United Press All-American and Grantland Rice All-America Honorable Mention. He played in both the Hula Bowl and the East-West Shrine Game before being drafted by the New York Gian Walker had to go in goal for the closing stages of the match.The full-back replacedome their next manager.The Hornets are chasing another boss after the sacking of Quique Sanchez Flores this weekend.The former Athletic Bilbao coach Ziganda was on their radar, but Sky Sports News reports that talks between the two parties ended with Claudio Bravo after the substitute goalkeeper was sent off during the 1-1 draw in Milan.Bravo was shown a straight red for a sliding tackle on Josip Ilicic outside tts in the 21st round of the 1951 NFL Draft.

Although Lemonick never played in the NFL, he stayed in Philadelphia and began coaching. Before returning to Franklin Field to serve as an assistant coach for the Red and Blue in 1955, Lemonick was a line coach at Saint Joseph’s Prep beginning in 1951.

Lemonick’s contributions to Penn football as an assistant mirror those from his playing career. A line coach under head coach Steve Sebo, Lemonick was on the sidelines when the Quakers clinched their first Ivy League title in 1959.

“We are incredibly saddened by the loss of such an iconic member of the Penn football family,” said cIFA Club World Cup final between Flamengo and Liverpool.The Hammers talent spotters were not there to spy on their Premier League rivals.They were present to assess Flamengo attacking duo Gabriel Barbosa and Bruno Henrique.The game ended in a 1-0 winurrent Penn football coach Ray Priore. “Bernie had illustrious careers both as a player and coach, and continued his unparalleled support of Penn football as an alum.”

Lemonick was part of Penn Athletics’ initial Hall of Fame class in 1996 and was named to the Philadelphia Jewish Sports Hall of Fame. He also served as Chairman of the University of Pennsylvania/Cornell University Trustees Cup annual awards dinner, a ceremony that recognizes the winner of the annual rivalry game between the two programs.

“Bernie will forever be remembered as someone who lived and breathed the Red and Blue, and we could not be more thankful for that,” Priore said. “Our thoughts and prayers go out to the Lemonick family at this time.”

Penn women's lacrosse ousted from Tourney by No. 1 Maryland

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Sunday’s rematch between Penn women’s lacrosse and No. 1 Maryland was different from the squads’ first meeting of the season in many ways. The end result, however, was not one of them.

In a game characterized by a series of runs from the Terrapins as well as staunch defense from the nation’s top-ranked team, Maryland managed to take down the Quakers for the second time in less than two months, capturing a 13-5 victory in the second round of the NCAA Tournament.

Just like its first matchup against the Terrapins on March 19, Penn found itself on the wrong end of the opening draw. Yet unlike the preid.The summer signing from Eintracht Frankfurt has battled for minutes under coach Zinedine Zidane.But he insists: “He has told me that he trusts me, that he is happy that I am here, and that I’ve done a lot to get to the Real. “I am happy, I hope tovious contest, the Red and Blue’s defense held strong in the early going, forcing several missed shots and two turnovers in the game’s first four minutes.

After withstanding Maryland’s early onslaught, the Quakers managed to strike first, taking a 1-0 lead when senior midfield Lindsey Smith found the back of the net 4:24 into the first half.

Smith’s early unassisted goal had Penn in a much better position than in the team’s first matchup with the Terrapins. Back in March, Maryland scored a mere 14 seconds into the game and Penn found itself in a 4-0 hole before it could get on the board.

Unfortunately for the Quakers, Smith’s strike was one of theester United are eyeing Norwich City fullback Max Aarons.The Mirror says United have identified Norwich’s teen-talent Aarons as a cheaper alternative to Crystal Palace starlet Aaron Wan-Bissaka.United are considering the other names on their shortlis few highlights on Sunday for the eight-time defending Ivy League champions. Maryland responded with a 4-0 run thanks to goals by sophomore midfield Taylor Cummings, junior attack Kristen Lamon, and a pair of er Raheem Sterling hit out at England fans jeering Liverpool defender Joe Gomez last night.Gomez was jeered by home fans during the 7-0 win over Montenegro. It came after Gomez was left with a scratch down his face and neck when Sterling accosted himgoals 10 seconds apart by junior attack Kelly McPartland and senior midfield Beth Glaros.

Trailing 4-1 with 11:38 remaining, the Quakers’ leading goal-scorer in 2014, senior midfield Tory Bensen, cut into the Terps lead with her 41st goal of the season. Sophomore midfield Nina Corcoran assisted on Bensen’s goal, her fifth assist in two games in this year’s NCAA Tournament.

54 seconds after Penn cut the score to 4-2, Corcoran found the back of the net with an unassisted goal of her own, bringing the Quakers within one.

It was the closest the Red and Blue would get the rest of the day.

Consecutive goals from junior attack Brooke Griffin over the next four minutes expanded Maryland’s lead to 6-3.

Bensen’s second goal of the afternoon stopped the bleeding momentarily with 3:39 remaining in the first period as the Quakers got within two goals yet again. But Glaros scored on a free position shot 55 second later, and Cummings added an unassisted goal with 33 second left before halftime to put Maryland up, 8-4, at the break.

The Terps seized control of Sunday’s game due in large part to their stifling defense. After Bensen’s goal cut Maryland’s lead to 6-4, the nation’s top-ranked squad closed out the contest by scoring seven of the game’s final eight goals.

And unlike the first half, the Red and Blue were unable to contain the Terps’ potent attack in the second period. Glaros completed the hat trick with an unassisted score just 21 seconds after halftime and Maryland was well on its way to victory.

Bensen completed the hat trick with her 43rd goal of the season with 19:50 remaining. But the Quakers went scoreless thereafter as the Terps added four goals to its total to seal the win.

Penn now enters its offseason off of a campaign in which it had the fifth-most wins in program history. Though the Quakers fell in their second game of this year’s Tournament, it marked the first time since 2010 that the Red and Blue won a game in the postseason.

EIWA race to heat up on campus for Penn wrestling

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The big day has finally arrived for Penn wrestling.

This weekend, the Quakers will compete in the 2014 Eastern Intercollegiate Wrestling Association (EIWA) Championships at home in the Palestra. This year’s tournament will b says Charlie Taylor could become an England international.The left-back has struggled for game-time this season as Erik Pieters has made the left-back spot his own.But Dyche sees enough potential in the 26-year-old for him to become a future member e the biggest yet, with 18 teams in the mix and 47 spots at the NCAA Championships up for grabs.

Despite an uneven season so far, Penn has been peaking recently, winning three straight duals over Columbia, Princeton and Drexel. The Quakers will look to take advantage of being under the radar to make a bigme an issue.John Stones and Nicolas Otamendi are now fit again, but Rodri has since picked up an injury and Fernandinho will be suspended for the Carabao Cup clash with Southampton on Tuesday.Guardiola said: “For the short term we can handle it. For showing in front of their home crowd.

“I think the guys are in a really good physical and mental state right now, we’ve had some really good workouts and they’re pretty excited,” coach Rob Eiter said. “I expect them to go out and wrestle their butts off. If they give everything they’ve got I think we’ll do pretty well.”

The favorites for the Red and Blue will be sophomores Casey Kent (165 pounds) and Lorenzo Thomas (184) , who are ranked No. 19 and No. 10 at their respective weightclasses. In order to conquer the EIWA crown, both of them might have to avenge losses from earlier this year to the probable No. 1 seeds.

Cornell’s Dylan Palacio, ranked 14th in the nation, defeated Kent twice this season, 4-1 and 4-2. Meanwhile, the last person to defeat Thomas was No. 3 Gabe Dean – also of Cornell – by the score of 7-5.

“Fortunately for both Lorenzo and Casey, they’ve already wrestled the guys that are seeded number one,” Eiter said. “If they go in there and just wrestle as well as we know they can – and they can – there’s nobody that’s heads and above somebody else right now in those two weightclasses.”

“I just need to wrestle smart against [Dean]. The last time it was close score-wise, but he kind of controlled the match for the most part,” Thomas added. “I need to wrestle my match and not let him do what he wants to do.”

Beyond the obvious duo, Eiter thinks most grapplers on the Red and Blue’s talented roster have a reasonable shot at pulling off what he called “an upset just on paper.” Amongst them are junior Jeff Canfora (141) and the freshman pair Frank Mattiace (197) and Caleb Richardson (125).

“I think Jeff and Frank are probably the two worst draws you can have … they definitely have the potential to beat anybody,” Eiter said. “Especially Frank’s weightclass is pretty wide open, everybody’s kind of beaten everybody, so that’s going to be very interesting.

“Caleb’s going to get overlooked and he has a ton of talent. His skill set is super high so he easily could be in the finals for us.”

For Kent, the key to success is simple.

“I [have] jmmer are wide open.Speaking with AD, Van de Beek denied claims of an agreement with Real Madrid and left the door open to joining Manchester United.On Real, he stated: “That is said and written, people take over, and then it starts to lead its own ust got to wrestle like I’ve been wrestling the whole season, not worry about what happens and just go out there.”

Tony | The clock is ticking for Penn's athletic director search

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How the search to find Penn Athletic Director Steve Bilsky’s successor will play out over the course of this semester is anyone’s guess. But what’s troubling is that we’re still playing the guessing game in the first place.

Bilsky announced he would retire effective June 30 back on Nov. 21. Then Thanksgiving Break happened. Then nothing happened.

On Dec. 9, Leo Charney, a spokesperson for Penn Provost Vincent Price, told The Daily Pennsylvanian that there would be an announcement soon about the formation of an advisory committee for the athletic director search. Then nothing happened. Then Winter Break happened.

And finally, on Jan. 15, Price announced the formation of a 14-member advisory committee co-chaired by himself and Penn Executive Vice President Craig Carnaroli.

If you’re keeping score, that’s eight weeks separating Bilsky’s goodbye and the proclamation of a plan to replace him. That’s too long and too problematic for whoever turns out to be Bilsky’s successor, because if the future of Penn Athletics starts now, why is it taking so long to arrive?

The next athletic director needs to be in place sooner rather than later if he or she hopes to have agency over the future of Penn’s winter and spring varsity sports. The future of coach Jerome Allen looms large for all Penn basketba for a move to Barcelona.Lacazette has been linked with a move to Barca in recent weeks.And Puel can see the transfer happening, having worked with Lacazette when Lyon coach.”Lacazette can be a player like Luis Suarez. He can drop down to midfield toll supporters, and the decision on whether to give a vote of confidence to Allen should rest squarely with the next athletic director, who should ter consideration at Spurs as cover for Harry Kane. The England captain won’t be seen again until April after undergoing hamstring surgery.Spurs have already sounded out Silva’s agent Jorge Mendes about his availability.The Portuguese is currently loaherefore be hired soon enough to observe the team in conference play and determine whether or not Allen should stay.

It would also benefit the next athletic director greatly to evaluate the rest of the winter and spring sports firsthand as well — not to be able to enact sweeping changes, but to simply measure what’s best for Penn Athletics going forward before Penn’s varsity schedules for this academic year are all but over.

That’s almost certainly not going to happen now.

Nominations and applications for the position will be accepted by the Office of the Provost until Feb. 28. Tack a thorough vetting period onto the end of that deadline, and you’re looking at the end of spring break, which lasts from March 8-16. Suddenly, St. Patrick’s Day doesn’t seem so lucky.

Texas had the right idea with its recent athletic director succession. Texas Athletic Director DeLoss Dodds announced on Oct. 13 that he’d be stepping down effective Aug. 31, 2014. By Oct. 14, a committee was in place to hire his successor. By Nov. 5, his successor, Steve Patterson, was hired and given full authority to decide how to approach struggling signature coaches like football coach Mack Brown.

Likewise, Princeton Athletic Director Gary Walters announced that he would retire at the conclusion of the 2013-14 academic year on Sept. 4. It tookaurizio Sarri.The Italian has guided the Blues to a third-placed finish and the Europa League final, which will be played against Arsenal on Wednesday in Baku.But Johnson, who played alongside Lampard, believes Sarri’s future has already been decided Princeton just 12 days to announce a 12-member committee to conduct the search for Walters’ successor.

So it shouldn’t have taken nearly as long as it did for Penn to identify folks within its community who deserve to be guaranteed a voice in this crucial vetting process and reach out to them. It’s true that the advisory committee that Price ultimately came up with is a fair and balanced one, a commendable mix of administrators, coaches, alumni, students and faculty. But that doesn’t excuse the wait.

And while Princeton may not have chosen Walters’ replacement yet, at least transparency is on the Tigers’ side. Princeton held three on-campus open forums inviting comments and suggestions about its athletic director search in October and November, and that kind of transparency is crucial. Princeton even has a website designed solely for the purpose of distributing information about its search process.

Price didn’t rule out open forums when I spoke with him earlier this month, but I don’t expect committee members to push hard enough for them specifically. That’s a shame.

And yet this search is in good hands with Price. He said last month that Penn will be reaching out proactively to candidates, and you can bet that Price is going to be diligent in this process. If you’re rooting for a successful search, thoughtfulness and thoroughness are on your side with Price at the helm.

Time isn’t, though. Advisory committee, you’re on the clock.

MIKE TONY is a senior English and history major from Uniontown, Pa, and is a senior staff writer for The Daily Pennsylvanian. He can be reached at dpsports@thedp.com.SEE ALSO

Phillips | The horror of Penn football's play-calling

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Fitting with the season, the Quakers traveled to Yale on Saturday, only to find themselves immersed in a horror story. For what it lacked in blood and gore, this tale made up for in psychological torture.

The Red and Blue faced two possible outcomes: taking the Ivy League by the horns, or making their last four contests — against the toughest of competition — must-wins.

They chose the latter, and the Red and Blue’s terrifyingly passive play-calling stands as proof.

On the second drive of the game, after moving the ball 57 yards with ease on the first eight plays, Penn stood on Yale’s 12-yard line with a 1st-and-10. It’s here where the horror begins.

First down: Ragone completes an eight-yard ster City youngster Brandon Barker is wanted by Celtic.The Celtic-line-cut-price-deal-Manchester-City-winger-Brandon-Barker.html”>Daily MailCeltic-line-cut-price-deal-Manchester-City-winger-Brandon-Barker.html”> says Celtic are lining up a cut-price pass to Ryan Mitchell. Just two yards separate the Quakers and a brand new set of downs; four yards stand between them and the end zone.

Second down: Ragone goes for six, but his pass to Conner Scott falls incomplete. That’s okay, though — they still only need two yards.

Third down: Ragone rushes for a yard, making it 4th-and-1 on the Yale 3. Momentum is on the Quakers’ side — even the Bulldogs wouldn’t bet on themselves to make the stop.

Fourth down: Loftus attempts a 21-yard field goal. And to add insult to passivity, Loftus misses.

You could just hear the ghosts of football games past laughing in Bagnoli’s face over the Yale Bowl crowd.

Bagnoli deserves the flack. For repared to start the season without Sadio Mane.Mane helped set up an extra-time own goal as Senegal beat Tunisia 1-0 to reach Friday’s AFCON final against Algeria.The final takes place exactly three weeks before Liverpool’s Premier League opener at han offense that runs on fumes just as often as it clicks on all cylinders, he should know better than to let one of the times when his offense is in sync go to waste.

But by the fourth quarter, down should’ve stood last night.Promes had Ajax 1-0 ahead in the Champions League tie – but VAR ruled it out for offside. Chelsea went onto win 1-0 thanks to Michy Batshuayi’s goal.“It was very funny that it was rejected, I don’t know if it was offside10, he’s sure to have changed his mentality, right?

The Quakers, who had moved 37 yards in four plays, began the fourth quarter on the Yale 28 with a Jeff Jack rush for 11 yards. Both Jack and Lyle Marsh ran well on Saturday, each averaging 5.7 yards per carry.

First down: A Ragone pass falls incomplete. Aggression is good. They need to put points up quick.

Second down: Ragone completes a pass to Scott for six yards. Alright, Bagnoli can either take a shot downfield, and if it fails, kick a field goal, or he can call a play that’ll put Penn in good position to make a conversion.

Third down: Ragone finds Marsh in the slot, where he gains just a yard. Sure, a run may have been a smarter move, given the way the Quakers have run the ball, but that’s okay.

Fourth down: Not surprisingly, Bagnoli sends out the field goal unit. Loftus drills one through the uprights for three.

From there on out, Penn was unable to match the Bulldogs’ bite, never reaching enemy territory for the rest of the game.

When a coach is unwilling to take chances, to play with his heart rather than his head, then his team will follow suit. That’s what happened on Saturday.

Bagnoli has shown an inability to instill in his team the energy it needs to win too many times this season. That’s what makes it so horrifying.

In two vital situations, Bagnoli opted not to lose rather than taking the chances necessary to win.

The ghosts of games past never reward such a mentality.

If you find yourself walking past Franklin Field as we draw closer to All Hallows’ Eve, stop and listen. You’ll still hear them laughing.

JOHN PHILLIPS is a junior English major from Philadelphia. He can be reached at dpsports@theDP.com.SEE ALSO

Penn's gymnasts inconsistent in season debut

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Though the Penn gymnastics team posted its best score at the Lindsey Ferris Invitational ever in its third visit on Sunday, it didn’t matter much in the final results .

After finishing third last year with an overall score of 189.025, Penn finished 4th this year at the George Washington University in Washington D.C., despite a final score of 189.575, their highest to date at the annual competition.

It was an intriguing start for a team with high aspirations and serious NCAA tournament hopes.

The Quakers were challenged from the start, having to begin their day on the beam — typically the most difficult event to start on, but one in which coach John Ceralde expects his team to improve this season.

Penn did not disappoint, finishing with a composite 47.975 despite falls from the usually consistent seniors Kirsten Strausbaugh and Dana Bonicontri, with the former working on a new skill which she hopes will pay dividends in the long run.

After two rotations, the Quakers were in second place, but struggled on the vault and bars despite has opened the door to signing a new midfielder this month.United have been linked with numerous midfielders in recent weeks, including Aston Villa’s Jack Grealish, Leicester’s James Maddison and Newcastle’s Sean Longstaff, as well as several currenta first place finish from Bonicontri on the latter.

At both events the Red and Blue were able to finish with three strong performances of 9.525 or better but couldn’t come up with the five necessary to reach a solid team score.

As Ceralde put it, the team “just couldn’t put it all together today.” Overall, though, he was impressed with his squad’s performance to kick off the season.

“We had a 189, can’t ask for more than that.”

Freshman Elyse Shenberger impressed in her collegiate debut, posting a 6th place 9.725 on the beam and a sol ahead of Sunday’s showdown.The United boss has come out fighting on the eve of their big clash with Liverpool – and said theieonardo was left unimpressed by Barcelona president Josep Maria Bartomeu’s claims regarding Neymar this week.At Frenkie de Jong’s signing ceremony, Bartomeu suggested Neymar wants to leave PSG and return to the Calatans.”We know that Neymar wants to r time in the title wilderness won’t be as long as their Anfield rivals, who last won in 1989/1990.Solskjaer defiantly solid 9.5 on the floor. Senior Megan Milavec also chipped in with a 9.75 on the on the beam and finished 8th overall with a 36.650.

Despite having off days by their standards, Bonicontri and Strausbaugh ended up fourth (by a score of 38.55) and fifth (38), respectively, flashing the skills that made them NCAA regional qualifiers last year.

The Quakers will head to Rutgers’ campus in New Brunswick, N.J. next Saturday to face the host Scarlet Knights, Bridgeport and Ursinus.SEE ALSO

Sushaan Modi | Time for W. Hoops to prove itself

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Ranked teams don’t normally schedule Penn women’s basketball. But this year’s team is different and needs to be challenged.

If the Quakers are to be successful this year, tonight’s matchup against No. 3 Notre Dame will be their most important game of the season.

The Red and Blue haven’t faced a player who can create her own shot as well as ND senior Natalie Novosel. They have never seen as quick, strong and agile a player as preseason All-American Skylar Diggins. They have never faced a rebounder as strong as Devereaux Peters.

But when Penn takes on the Fighting Irish at the Purcell Pavilion in South Bend, Ind., the Quakers can prove to the rest of the Ivy League and Big 5 that they are a team to be reckoned with.

“I hope it’s a game where we can look the opponent squarely in the eye and not back down,” coach Mike McLaughlin said. “It presents a lot of challenges but we can’t be afraid. I’m anxious. It’s great trip for our program.”

Coming off a win against No. 7 Duke, the Fighting Irish are easily the most talented team that Penn has faced under coach Mike McLaughlin.

A 2011 Final Four team, Notre Dame has only lost once this year — to No. 1 Baylor. In fact, the Irish have beaten all four unranked opponents they have faced by an average of 40.5 points.

But for the Quakers, this game represents an important measuring stick and could not have come at a more perfect is Smalling.Smalling is currently on-loan at Roma, though no permanent option was included.Roma have now opened talks with United about a fee for the defender.A first offer of €10m has been tabled – only half of the Red Devils’ asking price at a retime in the season. At 4-1, the Red and Blue are off to their best start in program history, but their play has been anything but solid.

Penn has struggled at points during games, most notably in the second half against Rider and La Salle, but has shown a growing maturity by expertly closing out games. Against Notre Dame, however, the Quakers won’t be able to afford mistakes or mental lapses.

“[They are] a special team that was a play away from a national championship,” McLaughlin said.

With four wins already, Penn is surging with confidence. McLaughlin has been able to balance the youth of three freshmen earning major minutes and experience of forwards Jess Knapp and Jourdan Banks.

The team can only benefit from playing agaielsea manager Frank Lampard admits his side face a tough test in the Premier League opener.The Blues travel to Old Trafford on Sunday to face Ole Gunnar Solskjaer’s Manchester United. Speaking after a 2-2 draw with Borussia Monchengladbach on Sunday,nst one of the country’s best teams, but that means showing up for a full 40 minutes.

“They have one of the best back courts in the country,” McLaughlin said. “f praise for Manchester United defender Axel Tuanzebe after their promotion back to the Premier League.United loanee Tuanzebe started alongside Tyrone Mings again at the centre of the Villa defence as they secured a deserved 2-1 win to return to the [We worked on] handling traps and trying to be secure with the ball, little things like that to handle pressure.”

A win, to be frank, would be a long shot. A loss by anything less than 20 points would be a resounding moral victory. But the greatest success the women’s basketball team can take away is a strong, mistake-free performance.

SUSHAAN MODI is a sophomore international studies and business major from Demarist, N.J. He can be reached at dpsports@theDP.com

Different cultures, same game for Eskenazi and Ion

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Though Sol Eskenazi and Alex Ion were both international recruits, their journeys to Penn were quite different.

As freshmen, both Eskenazi and Ion not only start, but lead the Penn women’s tennis team with eight wins each this spring.

Eskenazi, who hails from Buenos Aires, Argentina, was given the tall task of replacing now-pro Connie Hsu at No. 1 singles. Eskenazi has been almost perfect, losing just one match this spring.

Ion has been equally dominant for the Quakers this season. The Bucharest, Romania, native has only gotten better at No. 3 singles as the season’s gone on, winning five of her last six matches.

However, the two freshmen are even more impressive when considering how they got to Penn in the first place.

Eskenazi’s path to Penn began when she left her family in Argentina to train at the Mouratoglou Tennis Academy in France when she was 11.

She lived in France for three years before moving back to Buenos Aires. However, once she returned, she was constantly traveling to play in junior tournaments. “I didn’t see my family for like six months [at a time] and it was really hard,”

Eskenazi said.

But for her sacrifice, Eskenazi gained a reputation as one of the top young players in Argentina. She represented her country in the 2010 Junior Olympics and the 2009 Junior Fed Cup and competed in the 2010 Junior French Open and Junior Wimbledon.

At the time, Eskenazi was competing on the pro tour to build up her international ranking. However, she injured her left wrist in July 2010 and was unable to play on the tour for several months. To Eskenazi, the injury was somewhat of a relief. “I was quite tired of traveling a lot and competing,” she said.

Eskenazi had already been contacted by several college coaches and initially made Columbia her top choice. “I didn’t even know Penn at first,” she admitted.

However, after coming for a visit, she “fell in love with [Penn] and there was no other university that [she] wanted to go to.”

Compared to Eskenazi, Ion was a rather unheralded recruit.

Ion was unsure of what she wanted to do when she graduated high school and took a year off to play on the pro tour. Quickly, she realized that she was unlikely to make a living playing tennis and decided to pursue other options.

“I decided at that point that I really wanted to go to the U.S.,” Ion said. To help attract attention, she uploaded a video of herself playing tennis to YouTube.

She explained that her recruiting process was “mostly [her] reaching out to coaches,” as opposed to the other way around. “I felt like they were worried that I was an international player,” Ion said.

Ion was very excited when she spoke to Penn coach Sanela Kunovac.

“I heard a lot of good things about Penn,” Ion said, and decided to come to Philadelphia without going on an official visit.

Kunovac said deadlines prevented her from bringing in Ion for a visit, but she wasn’t worried about whether the Romanian would be a good addition to the team.

“In Alex’s case, it was so clear she’d fit right in,” Kunovac said. “As long as we got along in [phone] conversations, I knew she was going to like Penn.”

Eskenazi and Ion both cited Kunovac as one of the main reasons they decided to come to Penn.

“Sanela’s a great coach and that’s what convinced me,” Eskenazi said.

Kunovac, who was born in Bosnia, was an international player at Penn herself at and was named both Ivy League Rookie and Player of the Year in 2001.

Ion believes Kunovac’s background makes Penn mder Victor Lindelof admits he paid little attention to the new contract he was signing in September.Sweden international Lindelof agreed a new deal at Old Trafford until at least 2024 four months ago, which saw him more than double his salary from £ore attractive to international recruits.

“I felt like she’s more open to recruiting international players and I felt like she understood me.”

Kunovac agrees that she is better able than some of her peers to recruit internationally.

“I think one of the edges I have is that I played in Europe, which means that I know a lot of coaches and I have contacts,” Kunovac said.

*** While both players acknowledge that the adjustment to America, Penn and college tennis has been hard, the freshman phenoms have thrived in their first year at Penn.

Arriving in Philadelphia in the fall was Ion’s first time in America and she found “a different mentality, a different way of thinking,” than in Romania.

Eskenazi agreed. “I was just all over the place and school was really difficult. I would say I am still trying to adapt to the United States.”

Both credit their teammates and Kunovac for making their transition easier.

“I think it really helped that I made friends through the team,” Ion said.

This year has been Ion’s first time playing on a team, so she’s had to learn to cheer for her teammates and adjust to team meetings.

“It’s a positive change,” Ion said. “Being part of a team definitely brings out the best in us.”

Eskenazi agrees that being on a team has been a great experience. “You’re playing for everyone, not just yourself,” she said. “I think that’s the biggest difference between professional tennis and [college tennis].”

Despite any language or cultural barriers, the two have forged close bonds with their teammates.

“In the end, I feel like tennis is universal,” Ion said. “It is its own language.”

Both Ion and Eskenazi have loved their American experience thus far, but have experienced some culture shock.

“I think [America has] everything,” Eskenazi said. “America is the perfect society in some ways.”

What do the two miss most from home? “Meat,” the freshmen said in unison.

“I guess here twinter market move for Villarreal attacker Samuel Chukwueze.Foot Mercato says the 20-year-old has been attracting interest across Europe following his fine performances in La Liga, and it is thought that Villarreal would accept a bid of around £34m here is no meat,” Eskenazi said. “The first semester I think I had one steak, overall.”

Ion agreed, explaining that America has a “different food culture” than what she’s used to at home.

Beyond food, Ion and Eskenazi agree that the people here are different, but their individual cultural backgrounds lead them to different opinions as to why.

“People are more relaxed here,” said Ion in comparison to formerly Clder leave for £21million.The 22-year-old star proved a big hit during a season-long loan at Championship play-off finalists Derby, but it is believed Jurgen Klopp will allow him to leave the new European champions permanently.Wilson is desperate foommunist Romania. “They’re more optimistic. There’s not that much pressure.”

Eskenazi, who is from the more laid-back Argentina, whole-heartedly disagrees.

“Here, everything is really structured and in Argentina it’s not. I love that [about Argentina],” she said.

Kunovac believes “it might be easier” to be an international athlete at Penn now than when she was a student here 10 years ago.

“Communication is so different,” she said. “They’re so much more connected.”

Perhaps living in the age of Facebook and Skype as opposed to AOL and instant messenger makes it easier to make the transition to Penn as an international student.

Regardless of their backgrounds, Eskenazi and Ion have quickly broken into the starting lineup and made an impact on the Penn women’s tennis team.

That’s no simple task.

W. Tennis opens home schedule triumphantly

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Injuries can be disastrous, especially in an individual sport such as tennis. However, true athletes have the ability to overcome such personal struggles and pull off amazing feats in the spirit of teamwork.

Even with a persistent abdominal injury, senior tri-captain Shelah Chao didn’t let anything stand in her way last Saturday during the Quakers’ first home match of the spring, a 5-2 victory over Virginia Commonwealth.

The Red and Blue matched up with a Rams team that has a roster of just seven players. But all seven hail from different countries, not one of which is the United States.

Leaving it all out on the court, Chao fought through tough matches on both the singles and doubles courts.

“My stomach has really been bothering me lately. But it felt good today, so I was really excited,” said Chao.

Chao joined forces with Julia Krenkie de Jong admits he was worried his move to Barcelona would fall through.Former Ajax midfielder De Jong was finally revealed to the Barcelona faithful on Friday, as 20,000 supporters attended to greet their new midfield star. “Barcelona were alwoulbitskaya to form a brand new doubles pair in the No. 1 position. In their first time playing together, the duo beat VCU’s previously undefeated team of Cristina Arribas and Olga Borisova, 8-6.

This victory was especially significant for Penn (3-1) since the Rams’ pair had gone undefeated for the entire 2004 season, granting them a berth in the NCAA tournament.

Raluca Ciochina and Michelle Mitchell had another notable 8-5 win at No. 2 doubles over the team of Marianna Yuferova and Camille Ripert, which secured the Quakers the doubles point.

In singles action, Chao came out on top once again in an exciting match against Arribas. After taking the first set 7-5, Chao won the first game of the second set with a powerful overhead smash, and was well on her way to victory.

She was able to skillfully execute her serves, which she claimed really helped her win both of her matches.

“My serve was able to really bail me out today,” she said.

Koulbitskaya won an impressive match against fellow Russian player, Yuferova, who came into the match ranked No. 46 in the cou Aubameyang should be sold this summer.Either or both of the forwards may be looking for a move anyway if Arsenal again fail to qualify for the Champions League.”Key decisions need to be made [with Aubameyang and Lacazette],” Keown told Goal. “Are thntry. After winning a decisive third game in the second set, Koulbitskaya continued to wear down her opponent and never looked back.

Junior Sara Schiffman prevailed at the No. 6 position over Camille Ripert of Lourmarin, France.

For the second week in a row freshman Michelle Mitchell finished off the day winning a tie-breaker — this time against the six-foot Bulgarian, Viktoria Konstantinova, in the No. 4 position.

“I was feeling dejected in the first set,” Mitchell said. “I just felt like I had no rhythm. But then in the second set, I just started hitting higher balls and tried to take [Konstantinova] off her game. She started to get frustrated and I got more c to Manchester United next weekend.Negotiations between the Toffees and Pereira’s current club, Shanghai SIPG, have been ongoing over the past seven days.Sky Sports says Everton want the talks to be concluded prior to Sunday’s visit to Old Trafford.Ionfidence.”

Penn coach Michael Dowd was very impressed with the way his team played against an experienced and diverse Virgina Commonwealth team.

“We played tough. We looked a little bit more seasoned out there. I am very proud,” Dowd said after the match.

The Red and Blue takes on Maryland Saturday at the Levy Pavilion at 10 a.m.

M. Hoops' Lang, Tolan part ways with team

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Pat Lang will graduate from Penn this spring with a perfect shooting percentage in his time with the Quakers.

That is because the senior guard, who is 4-for-4 from the field all-time, will not be playing basketball for Penn this upcoming season.

Classmate Conor Tolan, a 7-foot center, will also not be sed player list.Arsenal have confirmed the departure of Danny Welbeck, who leaves the club at the end of his current contract along with goalkeeper Petr Cech and defender Stephan Lichtsteiner.Midfielder Aaron Ramsey, meanwhile, is joining Juventus asreturning to the Quakers this winter.

“They’ve decided that they want to do different things for their senior year, so I am in full support of whatever they want to do,” Penn head coach Fran Dunphy said.

Both players’ names have been removed from the team’s online roster for the upcoming season.

Lang, who will be remembered by Penn fans for his cheesesteak-clinching shot last year on Feb. 6 against Harvard, scored 11 career points for the Quakers. He appeared in 15 total games in his three years with the team, playing in four contests last season.

A native of Dublin, Ireland, Tolan appeared in nine games in his three years with the team, including four last year.

AFTER FAILING TO receive NCAA eligibility last season, Lorenz Manthey, a 6-foot-2 sophomore guard, has been cleared to play this upcoming season.

The NCAA raised questions about Manthey’s amateur status, since he had played with a professional squad in his native Germany.

Manthey maintained that he never received any compensation from the squad, and now the NCAA agrees.

ANOTHER NEW FACE on Penn’s roster this season could be North Carolina transfer Adam Franklin.

Franklin played with the Tar Heels’ junior varsity team last year before seeking out a chance to play for the Quakers.

Dunphy said that he has never seen Franklin play and that Franklin will play with Penn this year “if he’s good enough.”

A 6-foot-6 junior guard from New Castle, Del., Franklin is already listed on Penn’s online roster for the upcoming season.

FIRST YEAR PLAYER Brian Grandieri may not have a chance to step on the Palestra floor this season.

After having surgery on his anterior cruciate ligament in July, Dunphy called Grandieri’s chances of missing the entire season “more than likely.”

The typical recovery period for such surgery is five to six months.

“If he makes a miraculous recovery, then maybe he can help us at the end of the year, but it’s not something that we’re absolutely counting on,” Dunphy said.

Grandieri, a 6-foot-4 guard from local Malvern Prep, was named first-team All-State in both 2003 and 2004. The Media, Pa., native also earned “AAA” All-State Player of the Year honors last season.

If Grandieri sits out the entire season, he can apply for an extra year of eligibility during his senior year by receiving a Medical Hardship Waiver.

Dunphy also indicated that senior guard Tim Begley and sophomore forward Mark Zoller were also “banged up” in the offseason.

When asked whether those two would be ready for Penn’s Nov. 16 season opener against Quinnipiac, Dunphy replied, “I sure hope so. We’re counting on them.”

OTHER THAN PENN’S preseason NIT game against Quinnipiac, the school has yet to release any other dates for the upcoming basketball season.

Dunphy said that the schedule is completnnes whizkid Eduardo Camavinga.The 17 year-old midfielder has been one of the great revelations in Europe this season – and Real have moved quickly to register their interen to a move to Juventus.Max Allegri is considering his future at Juve.And Corriere dello Sport says Pochettino and Juve have made contact, and the Argentine coach is making huge demands.Pochettino wants €20million a year (£17.2m) to move to Italyest.L’Equipe says Real have made it clear they want to bring Camavinga to Spaine and it just needs the signatures of several Penn athletic administrators before its release, which he indicated could take place as early as tomorrow.