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Three takeaways from the Quakers' trio of contests at the Wooden Legacy

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Penn men’s basketball spent its Thanksgiving break in Anaheim, Calif., competing in the Wooden Legacy tournament. The Red and Blue (5-3) went 2-1 in their three games this weekend and took home a third-place finish. Here are three takeaways from the Quakers’ trip across the country.

Through the Quakers’ first eight games this season, several young players have contributed meaningfully to the team’s success. Freshmen Jordan Dingle, Max Martz, and Lucas Monroe are all averaging over 10 minutes per game, and Dingle has started in all seven games he has played this season.

Throughout the Wooden Legacy, this trio of freshmen continued to contribute in a big way. In Friday night’s 92-82 loss to No. 14 Arizona, Dingle led the Quakers in scoring with 27 points while also shooting 7-for-14 from beyond the arc. Dingle also led the team in scoring with 21 during Sunday’s battle with Long Beach State. Martz followed Dingle’s lead on Sunday by scoring 17 points on the back of 5-of-6 shooting from three.

Penn will need this trio of young freshmen to keep contributing in a big way if it hopes to take home the Ivy League title.

Many of Penn’s games in the early part of the season have been hard-fought, close contests decided in the waning moments of games. In these close games, turnovershis players have seen a different side of chairman Daniel Levy during their run to the Champions League final.Pochettino believes this season has also changed Levy’s approach to the club.”Of course, he’s more of a businessman than a football person,” and the opponents’ ability to capitalize on those turnovers can be a deciding factor in who wins and who loses.

This weekend, the Quakers continued to struggle somewhat with turnovers. In Thursday night’s 68-67 victory over Central Florida, the Quakers turned the ball over 22 times, which led to 21 UCF points. This was also the case in the Red and Blue’s victory over Long Beach State, when they turned the ball over 13 times. The game was close at thastle United boss Rafa Benitez is in London today to discuss contract terms.Sky Sports says the Spaniard’s current deal ends on June 30, and there is willingness on both sides to reach an agreement. It’s likely that talks between both parties will coe half, with both teams knotted at 43. It was only after eliminating turnovers in the second half that the Quakers were able to pull away with a 95-79 victory.

When the Quakers begin Ivy play, it will be important for them to limit turnovers if they hope to emerge on the winning side of their close contests.

Entering this season, Penn fans knew that the play of seniors AJ Brodeur, Ryan Betley, and Devon Goodman would be integral to the team’s success. The three showed promise of what they could do together in the games leading upans can turn Anfield into a fortress as Atletico Madrid come into town.The Reds are defending their Champions League title and could go out in the last 16 if they do not overturn a 1-0 first leg deficit.Milner knows it will be a battle against Diego to the Wooden Legacy. However, during this weekend’s tournament, the three stars showed Penn fans how they can take over a game against difficult competition.

During the Quakers’ Thanksgiving Day victory, all three players scored at least 14 points. Brodeur led the way with 23 and Betley and Goodman scored 19 and 14, respectively. The trio of seniors continued their success in the game against Arizona, with all three recording double figures in scoring and with Brodeur producing a double-double. This trend continued in Sunday’s victory over Long Beach State, where all three scored at least eight points.

This season’s Quakers have a high level of depth and young talent. However, the play of Penn’s “Big Three” of seniors in this weekend’s tournament showed that the team will rely on its experienced stars this season during its quest for an Ivy League title.

The Quakers will return home from Anaheim to prepare for a Wednesday showdown with Big 5 rival Villanova.

Penn fencing's Chloe Daniel finishes atop the Ivy League in her debut season

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Finishing at the top of the Ivy League as a freshman tends to surprise people.

Chloe Daniel even surprised herself.

The freshman fencer walked away from the Ivy League Tournament with the individual women’s epee title, defeating 12 opponents over the weekend and earning her a first team All-Ivy designation.

“I definitely surprised myself. I went into Ivies thinking I was just going to fence and see what happens. I focused on fencing for the women’s team. It didn’t even come to mind until after the first day when I saw that I was first on the results,” Daniel said.

Clocking the best record among all of the women’s epee fencers in the Ivy League is no small feat, especially considering the level of competition across the board. Princeton’s program is ranked No. 1 in the country, andaised Bulgaria captain Ivelin Popov for standing up to his own supporters during England’s 6-0 win on Monday.Popov called for fans in Sofia to stop directing racist chants towards the visitors, which caused the game to be stopped twice.”Not an easy s Columbia is not far behind at No. 2. It was Daniel’s contributions on epee, alongside fellow All-Ivy named teammate freshman Jessica Liang, that helped the Red and Blue topple the Tigers. Similarly, the Quakers were just one point shy of beating the Lions.

The contributions of the , led by Daniel and Liang, were fundamental in securing the overall team finish, tying with Princeton for second place, just behind Columbia.

“Columbia, Princeton, and Harvard have a ton of women’s epee fencers who have been on the women’s junior and national teams,” coach Andy Ma said. “If you’re smart, change quickly, and try to know your opponent well so that you play to your strengths and avoid your weaknesses, you can defeat junior and senior members. If you’re not careful you can lose to people behind you.”

Daniel, a Sierra Madre, Calif. native, has been fencing since she was nine years old. Her home club, Fortune Fencing, has sent numerous athletes to compete at top Division I fencing programs across the country. It was there where she was mentored under her longtime coach, Elsayed Emara. An Egyptian fencing national team athlete himself, Emara coached Daniel for the majority of her youth career, through extensive international competitions.

“I’ve been doing this for 25 years, and I’ve seen a lot. We see some kids that show they have incredible potential in the sport of fencing the first day. Chloe was one of those. When I started working with her, you could tell she was quiet, but she listened and applied everything that coaches told her,” Emara said.

Over her time at Fortune, Chloe’s talents as a junior fencer brought her countless opportunities to compete nationally and internationally.

“I have seen a lot of the U.S — really random places. Through international tournaments I’ve also seen random European countries as well. It’s been really cool to travel and see other parts of the world that I wouldn’t otherwise see or think about. That’s something I really appreciate from fencing,” Daniel said.

The freshman has had no shortage of competitions around the world. At the top of her list of accomplishments as a junior fencer was her Junior National Cadet team qualification, a feat accredited to only the top-3 ranked juniors in the counentre-half has yet to feature for Arsenal since joining on loan from Flamengo last month.And Arteta will only play Mari once he is ready.Speaking at the club’s warm-weather training camp in Dubai, Arteta said: “With Pablo a little bit more than Cedritry. To reach such a ranking, Daniel had to place well at a variety of international competiHyypia won 10 trophies in his decade at Anfield, including the Champions League, the UEFA Cup and two FA Cups and was captain until Gerard Houllier made Steven Gerrard skipper, at just 23, in 2003.The Finn told the Mirror: “You don’t need the armbations.

In 2016, Daniel competed at the USA Fencing Junior Olympics and recorded an impressive seventh-place finish. She’s traveled to compete across Europe from Finland to Bulgaria, where the Cadet World Fencing Championships were held in April of 2017.

After achieving great successes on the international circuit, the freshman has clearly adapted well to the collegiate fencing circuit. While junior programs typically focus on individual performance, shifting to a team setting places greater responsibility on individual performances for squad outcomes.

“Fencing collegiately is more fun because it turns it into a team sport. You’re fencing for your team instead of fencing for yourself. When you win, the team wins,” Daniel said.

Daniel has done a lot of just that.

The freshman has a 51-17 record on the season for a winning percentage of .750—the highest of the epee squad. With the end of her debut season in sight, she’s looking to continue improving.

“I want to develop some of my actions more so I have more options, so I’m relying less on the same thing when I fence. It also makes it more interesting. It gets kind of boring when there’s only a few actions that have been working that day but you want to do more,” Daniel said.

Women’s fencing still has the Temple Invitational ahead of them this weekend, where they will face off with high caliber teams including No. 5 Temple and No. 6 Penn State. It will also offer a rematch with Princeton. At their current eighth-place ranking, the Red and Blue will look to perform as a team in their last official tournament before NCAA Regionals in early March.

Going forward, the Ivy Tournament finish has also inspired great confidence for the potential of the program in future years. The Ivy League is incredibly competitive, and the Red and Blue were extremely close to coming away with a win.

“We lost to Columbia and Yale and for both of those it came down to a 5-4 bout to determine who would win. Deep down, we knew we won based off of calls that were made. We know that next year we can do better, and learn from what happened and try to get first,” Daniel said.

With the potential to end the season on a very high note, Daniel has an entire club rooting for her back home.

“I knew she would do really well at Ivies, but to be honest with you, she surprised me when she won last week. The competition was very high and very strong… We were jumping at the club, like, ‘Wow Chloe did it.’ It was a really happy moment for us,” Emara said.

If there are more surprises like that in store for Daniel and the rest of Penn women’s fencing, the Red and Blue are sure to round out the season on a high note.

Penn women's basketball rings in 2020 with a pair of wins in the Aloha State

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In the Quakers’ first trip to Hawaii since the 2015-16 season, they celebrated the new year with two wins in paradise.

Penn women’s basketball picked up a 70-55 win against Hawaii on Tuesday, and the Red and Blue kept the good times rolling into 2020 with a dominant 90-39 victory over Chaminade on Thursday. The Quakers’ two wins extend their unbeaten streak to six games as they build on the best start in program history.

In its first game of the week, Penn (10-1) got off to a slow start, falling to a quick 9-3 deficit and missing 13 of their first 14 shots from the floor. However, the fortunes would change and the visitors ended the quarter on a 14-4 run.

The Rainbow Wahine (6-7) came close to closing the gap several times throughout the game, even cutting the lead down to six in the second quarter. However, the Quakers would keep their composure each time and go on a run of their own to widen the lead.

Nursing a 14-point lead going into the locker room at halftime, Penn would not look back. Familiar faces starred for the Red and Blue, as freshman guard led the team with 23 points and junior center Eleah Parker dominated the paint with 10 points, nine rebounds and four blocks. The Quakers scored 36 points in the paint — over half of their total output on the day — while grabbing 27 rebounds on the defensive side of the ball.

After celebrating New Years’ Day thousands of miles from home, the team went back to business on Thursday against Chaminade (2-9). Unlike the Hawaii game, Penn’s encounter with the Silverswords was never close, with the struggling home side reduced to six players due to injury and illness. By the end of the first quarter, the Quakers had already jumped out to a 24-10 lead. Penn shot 55.6% from the field, and its 90 points were split among 14 players.

The 51-point win is the team’s largest margin of victory since by 64 points in January 2018. Once again, Padilla and Parker led the team with a combined 24 points and 9 rebounds. With an largeer Onel Hernandez says they must work harder and battle for points in the Premier League.The Canaries lost 3-1 at home to Manchester United on Sunday evening, stretching their winless run to six in the league.Hernandez told the club’s website: “I’m lead from early on, the team was able to give large minutes to players who don’t usually get the opportunity. Sophomore guard Mia Lakstigala put up 15 points and a career-high four rebounds off the bench. In total, the bench had its best performance of the season with 53 points.

“Today was a chance to be able to play players that are really developing, so they’re not getting as many minutes now this year,” coach Mike McLaughlin said. “They were invaluable minutes.”

While the two road wins helped the team’s record, the trip also allowed them to grow closer as a team. After a break for the Christmas holiday, the team reunited in the Golden State and practiced at the Cal State Los Angeles gym. Padilla is from the area and her family hosted the team for a dinner.

“My teammates here have become my family, so for them to meet my actual family in California and to have everyone meet each other was an awesome feeling,” Padilla said.

The team also did not miss out on the opportunity to take advantage of everything that Hawaii had to offer. Given that the Philadelphia weather doesn’t allow for much time at the beach during the season, the will be played this weekend, reports www.fcbusiness.co.ukMatches in the Vanarama National League, National League North and National League South will go ahead this weekend despite all league football in England and Scotland being postponed until 3 Ateam spent most of their time enjoying the beach.

“It’s only my freshman year and we’re taking these great trips and [it’s great to] just to be here and make memories with my teammates,” Padilla said. “It helps to be 2-0 on the road in such a great place and it’s a really great way to end the year and start off 2020.”

The Quakers will take their six-game winning streak back to the Palestra as they face off against Princeton to open Ivy League play next week. Last season, Penn shared the regular season title with the Tigers, and were bested by their rival once more in the Ivy League Tournament Championshion player of the year.The Dutchman beat Manchester City attacker Raheem Sterling to the award, making him the fourth Liverpool player to win in seven years.”I want to say that, obviously, I’m sorry that I can’t be there tonight,” he said in a video ip.

Throwers often go under the radar, but Rachel Lee Wilson is firmly in the spotlight

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Over the past few years, senior thrower Rachel Lee Will, according to reports.The Spaniard has featured in all eight Premier League games since joining the Gunners on a season-long loan.Ceballos hinted this week that he would be open to leaving Real Madrid for Arsenal on a permanent basis.However, Real son has become one of the most dominant athletes in Penn track. The numbers don’t lie: Wilson currentlyetiah is playing his way into Arsenal manager Unai Emery’s new season plans.The Sun says Nketiah, 20, was due to join Bristol City on-loan.But Emery may keep him around after an impressive pre-season goals against Bayern and Fiorentina.Freddie Ljungb holds the program record in the outdoor hammer throw (63.89 meters) and the indoor weight throw (20.53m). These numbers secured her a second consecutive title in the Ivy League Indoor Heptagonal Championships earlier this season.

But unlike most student-athletes, Wilson did not compete in these sports during high school, since the hammer throw is not offered as a high school sport in any state except Rhode Island. Instead, her main events were the discus and the shot put, while she would only practice the hammer throw during the summer with her father, who was also a thrower in high school.

“I applied to Penn, and I contacted the coach at the time and I asked if he had any spots on the team, because my numbers were decent, but they weren’t good enough to get recruited,” Wilson said. “He didn’t have any girls recruited that year, so it ended up working out. Once I got here, I started to get more serious with the hammer and now that’s my main event.”

After joining the team in 2015, Wilson quickly started to impress. During her first season as a Quaker, Wilson recorded 21 top-10 performances between the two events and set the school record in the weight throw at Indoor Heps, placing third. She was also named the team’s most valuable player of the freshman class. From then on, the now-senior has held the weight throw program record and keeps extending it each year.

In her junior year, Wilson really stood out, winning six meets in the weight throw, including an individual indoor Ivy Heps title. She successfully defended her title this year when she became the first Penn athlete ever to crack the 20m mark in the weight throw.

In the hammer throw, Wilson has been just as unstoppable. After being named to the second team All-Ivy list in 2017, the thrower came back even stronger and collected an outdoor Ivy Heps title. Furthermore, she also received an honorable mention after a in the NCAA Outdoor Championships.

But the secret for Wilson’s success during her time at Penn does not come from any pre-meet rituals or superstitions. In fact, Wilson credits her accomplishments to her time management skills and hard-work.

“She had already achieved so many things, but after having a phenomenal junior year, she further dedicated herself, trying to get to the next level,” throwing coach Jeff Pflaumbaum said. “It’s amazing to see how she can excel in both academics and athletics, especially in an Ivy League school. This dedication makes her a leader; she’s always trying to push the group forward.”

Despite being ranked No. 111 in the world, Wilson does not plan to continue her career in track. After graduation, she has plans to move to Michigan and work as an engineer, but for now, the senior still has higic says the players know their Champions League hopes are on a knife-edge after their 4-4 thriller with Ajax.The result, coupled with Valencia’s 4-1 victory over Lille, leaves Group H incredibly tight, with three teams at the top on seven points. Cheh hopes for the end of the season.

“After NCAAs last year, I wasn’t really happy with my performance, and I really didn’t want it to happen again,” Wilson said. “My main goals are to make it to the NCAAs again, to set the new Ivy League record for hammer, and to win the Ivy Heps again.”

Penn Relays isn’t famous for its throwing events — they don’t take place at Franklin Field and are in some ways overshadowed by the track events. Fans don’t always know where to go to watch the throwers. If fans were to go to the Mondschein Throwing Complex on Thursday, they’d get a chance to watch a three-time Ivy champion.

DP Sports Player of the Week: Rory Starkey

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At halftime, Penn football was down 13-10 to Harvard and needed somebody to step up in the second half. That somebody turned out to be sophomore wide receiver Rory Starkey.

Starkey caught two touchdowns for the Red and Blue — the team’s only second-half scores — in Saturday’s tight , good for DP Player of the Week honors.

After not playing a single snap last season, the sophomore came out of nowhere to star as one of Penn’s leading receivers, serving as a target for senior quarterback Nick Robinson all season long.

Coming into this weekend’s game, Starkey had already made a name for himself as an offensive weapon for the Quakers. His four receiving touchdowns werhelsea legend John Terry believes they are in the best position to finish fourth in the Premier League.The Blues have seen their lead cut down after losing to Manchester United at home on Monday night.And they have the small matter of Tottenham comine already the most of any player on the team, and his pair against Harvard means he now has double the next-best receivers, sophomore Ryan Cragun and senior Kolton Huber at three each.

Just over a minute into Stefano Pioli admits he wants more from Krzysztof Piatek and Lucas Paqueta.Both youngsters joined Milan a year ago, but have struggled to live up to their initial hype.“I have no doubts about Paqueta, he’s a mezz’ala,” said Pioli.“He works hard the third quarter, Robinson and Starkey combined for a 70-yard touchdown to put the Quakers up 17-13. The pass was both Robinson and Starkey’s longest scoring play of the season and took away any positive momentum Harvard had from the break.

The Crimson would answer back later in the third to retake the lead, but Starkey again would electrify the visiting crowd with seven minutes to play in the final quarter.

On fourth and 1 inside Harvard’s red zone, Robinson found Starkey once again with a 16-yard pass that the sophomore grabbed with one hand before securing the score in the end zone. Even more than putting Penninuing with Willian.Lampard has made it clear he wants the midfielder to stay.He told chelseafc.com: “I know the club are talking to him. Willian and Callum (Hudson-Odoi) are both players I want in my squad. “We’ve made some good moves this pre-seaso back on top, Starkey’s second touchdown of the day put the Quakers’ defense in the spotlight after stopping the Crimson twice late to seal the game.

Starkey has shown time after time that he is capable of not only playing with the Ivy League’s best, but thriving in high-pressure scenarios. He still has one more game to add to his 2019 statistics, but 2020 and 2021 might hold even more success.

Penn track makes history throughout three days of competition in the 125th Penn Relays

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Even after 125 years, the Quakers proved they still had something to add to the storied legacy of the Penn Relays.

After a thrilling weekend of competition with over 15,000 participants from almost every level of track competition and countries all over the world, Penn track came away with one of its most successful performances in Relays history.

The Quakers did not waste any time making their presence known. In the College Women’s Championship of America Distance Medley Relay, the first of many Championship of America events, the Red and Blue came out on top.

The Quakers got a fast start from junior and 2019 NCAA Indoor runner-up Nia Akins in the the 1200-meter leg of the relay, separating herself from the pack on her third and final lap and giving Penn an early five second advantage.

Akins passed the baton to sophomore Uchechi Nwogwugwu, who proceeded to break her own Penn record in the 400 with a time of 52.22 seconds.

“I think every year I come to Penn Relays and something special happens to me,” Nwogwugwu said. “I run my season best every time I run here.”

While the other teams were able to close the gap a little on sophomore Melissa Tanaka and junior Maddie Villalba, the Quakers’ early advantage was simply too much for the other 14 teams in the field to overcome, as Villalba came down the final stretch well ahead of the rest of the teams.

“I was yelling ‘stay in the moment’ because it is hard when you are by yourself and the crowd is going crazy with the announcer yelling, ‘no Ivy team has ever done this before!'” coach Steve Dolan said.

“I needed [the stay in the moment call]. It was very grounding to come around every lap and know that I was going to get what I needed from coach,” Villalba said.

The Quakers would finish over three seconds ahead of second place Notre Dame in a performance that made them the first Ivy League women’s team to win a Championship of America relay.

The relay win was just the beginning for the Quakers on Thursday. Sophomore Camille Dickson won move to Wycombe Wanderers in League One.When Aarons found out that he was not a part of the 25-man Magpies squad for the Premier League, he knew that a loan move was his only option.It is when he decided that he would take on any opportunity that gavthe long jump college event, senior Rachel Lee Wilson placed sixth in the championship section of the hammer throw, and junior Maura Kimmel placed ninth in the shot put championship.

The excitement was not dampened by the rain on Friday, as sophomore Ashley Anumba placed second in the discus Championship of America and sophomore Cristian Constantin became the second Quaker of the weekend to win the long jump college event.

The Red and Blue came back on Saturday with plenty of chances to add wins to their already historic performance. After clearing 1.82 meters, senior Anna Peyton Malizia took home Penn’s second Championship of America win of the tournament.

The Quakers also took to the track for three different Championship of America relays. Despite Akins’ record-setting split of 2:02.33, the women placed fifth in the 4×800, while the men’s team finished sixth in the same event.

Facing a difficult battle in the women’s 4×400, the team of freshman Skyla Wilson, junior Cecil Ene, junior Elena Brown-Soler and Nwogwugwu broke the school record with a time of 3:35.43, finishing second to South Carolina.

“We were running against the national champs, so we knew we would have to chase,” Brown-Soler said. “Our goal was to go 3:35 to break our school record and beat our regional mark, and that’s what we did.”

In the field events, Penn also found success, getting a second-place championship finish from freshman Marc Minichello in the javelin throw and an says the 18-year-old was loaned back to Elland Road after his £10million move to Spurs – but has not made a Championship appearance.And Marcelo Bielsa will have £10,000-a-week off the wage bill and a place in his squad when Clarke’s season-long d fifth-place discus championship performance from sophomore Chudi Ikpeazu.

Even for the athletes who didn’t claim victories, the Penn Relays were still an incredibly special event for all involved.

“We get to p Didier Drogba.The Nigerian has been sensational in his first season with LOSC.He told France Football: “Didier Drogba, that’s my idol. In every sense of the term. For everything. The man, of course, and also the player he was. “I grew up watching hiractice in [Franklin Field] every day, but when you come for the Relays, it’s completely different. It’s a little bit intimidating, but we just tell ourselves this is our home, this is our track,” Brown-Soler said.

In an event with so much history and hype, it is safe to say that the 125th running of the Penn Relays will be remembered for years to come.

Penn football visits ESPN Headquarters for Ivy League media day

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BRISTOL, CONN. — The actual games may still be weeks away, but Ivy League football is officially back and ready for the 2019 season, as evidenced by Thursday’s media festivities at ESPN headquarters.

The “worldwide leader in sports” played host to representatives from all eight Ivy teams for a daylong celebration of Ancient Eight football and the expanding partnership between the conference and the ESPN+ streaming service.

Representing the Quakers were coach Ray Priore, senior running back Karekin Brooks, and senior safety Sam Philippi.

As part of the experience, the trio toured ESPN’s massive campus, glanced behind the scenes at content production, participated in a SportsCenter read-through, and, in culmination, joined the studio live on ESPN+.

In that last portion, Priore, Brooks, and Philippi were interviewed by acclaimed television personality and Yale football alum Jack Ford. In addition to answering questions from Ford, the Quakers fielded queries from a host of media members sitting in the studio’s audience.

The questions themselves spanned various topics — from a quarterback battle between Ryan Glover and Nick Robinson to the team’s trip to China last March.

While coach Priore and company did not elaborate much on game plan details, the Quaker representatives did speak glowingly of their spring break trip, citing the “chemistry” and “leadership” fostered by such an experience.

That leadership was on display throughout the interview process, especially when Philippi was asked about his season-ending injury from last year. The two-time All-Ivy honoree refused to deem 2018 a “lost year,” saying instead that his experience last year was “very meaningful” and that, even injured, he was able to be with his teammates “every step of the way.”

Continuing that theme of leadership was Brooks, the star running back and two-time All-Ivy selection. When asked b next season.The Sun says the Blues hierarchy are preparing for their appeal against a transfer ban being rejected and will tell thistiano Ronaldo while playing for Manchester United.The 33-year-old won four Premier League titles and the Champions League in his eight seasons at United between 2007 and 2015.Speaking to Tribuna Expresso, Nani said: “No. I never felt in the shadow e duo they will have to stay and fight for their places.Striker Abraham has dazzled at Aston Villa, who would like to by Ford about Penn football’s unique commitment to community service, Brooks spoke glowingly on the subject, saying that such social consciousness “embodies the Penn football character.”

Penn was picked to finish fifth in the Ivy League’s preseason poll released last week. The favorite is Yale, followed closely by Dartmouth and Princeton. Pimminently.The club have two points from nine games and los 3-2 to Nottingham Forest on Friday night.Jones has been at the club since January but has been unable to turn around their fortunes.He said to reporters about his position: “If results don’tenn was one of three teams to not receive one of the 17 first-place votes, along with projected bottom-dwellers Cornell and Brown.

Those projections won’t be tested for another month. The day’s focus, therefore, seemed to be more on the experience of touring the Bristol studios than answering meaningful football questions. After all, those questions will be answered over ten games in the fall. Touring ESPN’s headquarters is a once in a lifetime opportunity.

Anthony and Delia Russo are dynamic sibling duo for Penn cross country

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Is it possible for two siblings to be equally good at the same sport and play for the same team? The Russo siblings on Penn’s cross country team have an answer to that.

Junior Anthony Russo has excelled representing the Quakers at every recent meet, coming in at 11th overall at last week. His younger sister, freshman Delia Russo, has also impressed recently, finishing 21st overall in the women’s open race at the same invitational.

But how did this shared success begin? The siblings began their careers at Colts Neck High School in New Jersey, eventually making it all the way to the state’s Meet of Champions.

“My sister started runnierton. The talented 23-year-old defender has committed to a four-and-a-half-year deal with the Toffees, keeping him at Goodison Park until 2025.”This is my fifth year at Everton and my development as a person and a player in that period has been massng cross country her sophomore year of high school, and I was a little bit later, starting my junior year. So we’re both relatively new to cross country,” Anthony said. “We both were [already] doing well in track, a spring sport in high school, so we figured doing [cross counRichard Shaw has left his role as head coach of Crystal Palace’s under-23 side. Shaw was instrumental in bringing through Aaron Wan-Bissaka into the Palace first team.He departs Selhurst Park to pursue other opportunities in the sport.Shaw told the club’s official website: “I’ve enjoyed my time at Palace but now it’s time to explore other exciting coaching opportunities.”try] in the fall and year-round would help our track seasons a lot. Once we actually did the sport, we pretty much fell in love with it.”

Ever since then, the relationship between both sibling athletes has been incredibly supportive. They both continuously hope for the other to succeed, helping out in the process through mutual ideas and strategies.

“We’ll compare our times, so [our relationship] is competitive in that nature, but more so supportive,” Delia said. “If I’m ever having trouble with anything, I could always talk to [Anthony], since I feel like he has more experience.”

“Anytime I see [Delia] have a good workout or race well, it definitely motivates me to race well or vice versa,” Anthony said. “Or anytime she has a question about something with training or with a race, we feed ideas off each other. Competition helps both of us.”

Moreover, Anthony’s presence as a star on the cross country team at Penn has helped Delia’s transition from high school to running on the college level. She didn’t have to worry about joining the Quakers, as her brother would reassure her of the great dynamic of the team.

“I didn’t really have to think about things that other freshmen probably had to think about and stress about coming in, so it was good to have him just to have a smoother transition,” she said. “From what [Anthony] described, I knew it would be a good fit for me.”

What’s even more surprising is how it turned out to be somewhat of a coincidence that both athletes ended up at Penn. But it also turned out to be very convenient for their biggest fans — their parents — and ultimately the best choice for the two.

“Honestly, [Anthony] wasn’t really a factor in [deciding to go to Penn]. I wanted to go to Penn since my freshman year of high school, and once he got in, it pushed me to work even harder,” Delia said. “[Our parents] are definitely happy about it, because it makes everything so much easier for them, such as traveling to different meets. It’s nice because they can see both of us at once instead of having to choose which meet to go to.”

Both siblings strive to get better every day as they prepare for increasingly tougher meets throughout the fall season. In addition to their coaches, teammates, and friends, the siblings have each other as a resource to improve and lead the Red diger during victory at Wolves.Rudiger was withdrawn at half-time of the 5-2 win.Lampard said, “He’s had a groin issue which he bothered when he ran off the pitch near me. He slipped on to the metal which made him slide and adjust himself.”Hopefully and Blue to future success.

Penn cross country impresses in meets at Penn State and Princeton

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Two days, two impressive meets for Penn cross country.

On Friday morning, both teams traveled to State College, Pa. for the Penn State National Open and went home with top-five finishes. The next day, runners who did not race at Penn State made the shorter trip to compete at the Princeton Invitational, where the men’s team placed sixth out of 24 teams, and the women finished a respectable 14th.

At Penn State, junior led the way for Penn, finishing second overall in the 5.2-mile run. It was a true team effort for the men today, as all runners — Russo, seniors Andrew Hally and Will Daly, and juniors Noah Carey and Daniel Cohen — finished inside the top 25. For the women, fellow junior Melissa Tanaka was the first Quaker to cross the finish line, and coach Steve Dolan was enthusiastic about her performance.

“That was probably Melissa Tanaka’s best cross country race of college, she was the first runner finishing,” Dolan said. “She’s done a great job, she’s more of a middle-distance runner in track, so it’s really fun to watch her excel in cross country.”

Tanaka, who has an accomplished track career at Penn that includes a school record and multiple Ivy League Championships, is proving to be just as valuable for the cross country team as well.

Overall, the men finished runner-up to Philadelphia rival Temple, but beat out several schools including Georgia Tech, William & Mary, and Lehigh. The women finished fifth out of 16 teams, one place behind Ivy League rival Princeton.

Running a familiar trail on Saturday in Princeton, N.J., senior Mitchell Poynter finished first for the Quakers and 14th overall. Senior Christina Rancan had the fastest finish of the Penn women on the day, in what was a bit of a how for the Westfield W-League 2019/20 regular season—the league’s twelfth campaign—which begins with Western Sydney hosting Adelaide on November 14 and three more games on Sunday, November 17. Post the Women’s World Cup, some high-profile W-Leaguemecoming for her, since she attended high school just a couple of miles outside of Princeton.

As a result of the Quakers’ recent success, both teams have burst . The women are No. 23 nationally and first in the Mid-Atlantic region, whileng has confirmed talks with Manchester City before agreeing to move to Spain.While with Ajax last season, De Jong held extensive negotiations with City, only to choose to sign terms with Barca in February.Speaking with Voetbal International, the midf the men have received recognition as the No. 3 in the region and received four votes in the national poll. After another successful weekend, the teams could be poised to make a jump in the polls.

The Red and Blue will aim to fare similarly in their next meet, the Ivy League Heptagonal Champiot season.The winger is interesting Arsenal.But Fraser said: “I’ve got a year left. There’s a very good chance I’ll be here next season.“If that’s that then I’m going to try my best as I always do and I’ll enjoy it.“I love the group here and the fnship on Nov. 1 in the Bronx, N.Y. While the runners will certainly be happy with their performances this weekend, they are already looking forward to their next meet.

“That meet always adds a lot of excitement, with the history of it, so the excitement will be there in addition to the preparation over the next two weeks,” said Dolan.

The Quakers will spend the next two weeks preparing for championship as they look to improve upon their finish from last season, where the men’s and women’s teams finished fourth and eighth, respectively.

Meet the freshman big three that's helping Penn men's squash reach new heights

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—The “Big Three” in sports is not a new phenomenon, but it is one that’s becoming more and more popular as teams seem to be deliberately building around a dynamic trio. LeBron, D-Wade, and Bosh; Steph, Klay, and Durant; Tom Brady, Bill Belichick, and Robert Kraft.

Penn men’s squash seems to have adopted this approach with its own freshman big three — Aly Abou Eleinen, James Flynn, and Michael Mehl — all of whom have helped propel the program to the very top of collegiate squash.

The freshmen have combined for a 24-0 record in their individual matches. In terms of games, they are a stunning 72-14.

Eleinen, like his teammate senior Karim Hussein, hails from Egypt. The freshman is recognized as potentially the best squash player to ever come out of his high school alma mater, the Brooks School. There, he was All-New England three times, twice an All-American, and in his senior year, he was recognized as New England co-player of the year.

Mehl, who stands at an imposing 6-foot-4, served as the sed-length contract.The 26 year old Canadian-born striker, who began his career at Sheffield Wednesday, helped the Blades win promotion to the Championship in 2016/17.”It doesn’t do players any good to keep going out on loan,” said Walsall manager Dacaptain of the Canadian Junior Squash team. He led the groheffield United boss Chris Wilder insists Leon Clark can force his way into their first team plans.Wilder has reminded the 34-year-old he provides a potentially valuable alternative should his team find themselves being forced to change tactics mid-gup to a gold medal in the Canada Winter Games in 2015, while also claiming an individual gold medal.

Flynn brought his team to the Conference of Independent Schools of Ontario Championship from 2015-2018, serving as the captain of the team his senior year.

Their contributions have helped Penn soar to unprecedented heights. For the first time in program history, the Quakers sit atop the College Squash Association’s rankings.

Squash, despite its individual nature, is still very much a team sport at the collegiate level. So beyond their talents, these freshmen attribute much of their success to the welcoming environment around them, which provided a smooth transition from high school to the top of the college squash world — something that could have been incredibly jarring in a less accommodating environment.

“I think the seniors have played a huge role in our success so far,” Eleinen said. “Speaking on behalf of the freshmen, we came in and they helped us in right away. If we needed anything, they were always there for us, and they showed us what it means to be a part of something bigger than yourself.”

Mehl echoed these sentiments.

“It feels as though the seniors, on this team at least, lay the foundation for the whole of the team,” he said. “Whenever we’re down, they’re people who bring usover for the German.”I have a really good relationship with Ter Stegen, very professional. He’s helping me quite a lot,” admitted Neto. “Although I’ve only been here a short time, I already feel I’ve adapted well. I enjoy being part of the group and back up.”

There is a palpable sense of excitement around the team, a feeling that perhaps has never been felt to this extent before. The Quaker Meeting House’s “Recognizing a Significant Moment in a Program’s History,” published on the Penn Athletics website, is tangible proof of this energy.

The writers are barely able to contain their excitement, citing quotes from sports film classic “Field of Dreams” and commenting on how nice of a ring “Penn Squash — National Champions” has to it. The pressure and expectations could be too much for a team with less experience.

Eleinen, Mehl, and Flynn are more than up for the task.

“Obviously, it’s a lot of pressure because college squash is pretty competitive,” Eleinen said. “But I think so far, the freshmen have been doing a good job. It’s all about working hard and doing what you can do, and everything works out in the end.”

Landau | Scheduling Penn-Princeton games back-to-back makes no sense

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In the third week of January, when Penn students return to campus for the beginning of the spring semester, they might be looking forward to a lot of different things. For some, that list might include the opportunity to watch Penn men’s basketball compete against archrival Princeton at the Palestra. But by that time, this game will have already been played. And so will the matchup between the two teams at Princeton.

Penn will travel to New Jersey to play the Tigers on Saturday, and next week the Quakers will return to Philadelphia to host their Ivy League foe on Jan. 12. On the surface, this scheduling doesn’t seem to make much sense; looking deeper doesn’t reveal any solid justification either.

For the past six seasons, the Red and Blue have opened their conference slate on a Saturday in early to mid-January against Princeton. Playing one of the two matchups between the teams at this time doesn’t pose much of a problem, especially when the other game is contested mid-week in February, as it has been for two consecutive years. However, playing the games back-to-back over winter break is a poor alternative that opens up a couple of major problems.

First, the scheduling makes it extremely difficult for students of either school to be able to attend. Princeton’s break ends earlier than Penn’s, but its students do not officially return until Jan. 7, two days after the teams compete on their campus. By Jan. 16, when Penn’s spring classes begin, the second game at the Palestra will be over as well.

Eliminating the student section, which this scheduling decision effectively does, takes away the essence of a college basketball game. Anyone who was at theis new job with Chelsea.Cech was named the club’s technical and performance advisor last week.He told their website, “I will be closely working with everybody at Cobham, every department – performance, recruitment, the team – and I have had 20 year Palestra for the can attest to that, and a rivalry as steeped in history as Penn-Princeton deserves the best possible crowd.

This also means that for the second consecutive year, the vast majority of Penn students won’t have a chance to attend one of the most important home games on the schedule, since at the Palestra was also over break. That isn’t fasistant coach Per-Joar Hansen is well aware of the transfer interest swirling around RB Salzburg striker Ering Haaland.The teenage forward is being celebrated across Europe after his Champions League hat-trick last week against Genk. The treble in thir to anyone, and it won’t exactly do much to increase the sometimes-lacking attendance from students at basketball games (or any Penn sports games).

More significantly, scheduling the games back-to-back places too much importance on how the teams are playing at one moment in time. None of Penn’s games against other Ivy League opponents this season are less than two weeks apart, and some, like those against Yale and Brown, are spread out by as much as a month.

There’s a reason why college basketball teams usually don’t play the same conference rival back-to-back. The health and development of individual players evolve throughout a season, as do the strategy and cohesion of a team as a whole. Spreading games out allows these changes to have an impact and deemphasizes the importance of one random week in the regular season in determining a result that stacker James Rodriguez.Graziani spoke to Radio Kiss Kiss about what he and Napoli coach Carlo Ancelotti have chatted about recently.“I had dinner with Ancelotti, he is expecting a couple of top buys from the President. The players said the same, thhould reflect the year overall.

This scheduling move does the opposite. Instead of reflecting how the teams are playing throughout the season, or at least how they are playing in Ancient Eight competition, the Penn-Princeton series will show how good they are in early January, three weeks before the Quakers and Tigers compete in any other Ivy League games.

Penn-Princeton men’s basketball is a historic rivalry. It deserves a pair of great spots on the calendar, regardless of how difficult that might be to achieve. This year, the scheduling has fallen far short of what should be expected.

That isn’t fair to the fans, and more importantly, it isn’t fair to the players.

is a Wharton sophomore from Scarsdale, N.Y. and a Sports Editor for The Daily Pennsylvanian. He can be reached at .

Penn cross country struggles on muddy course at Ivy Heps

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Damp, uninviting conditions played as the backdrop to the crown jewel of the Ancient Eight’s cross country season: the Ivy League Heptagonal Championships, an event that saw the youthful Quakers face difficulties.

At the , the men’s squad finished in third place while the women’s came in at seventh place. In this year’s edition, both the men and women took a small step back: fourth place for the men, eighth place for the women.

Defending champions reigned supreme on Saturday. Princeton took home the men’s crown with 30 points, and Columbia’s nationally ranked women’s squad defended their 2017 gold with 52 points. Both champions were more than 30 points clear of the second place finisher — a true show of dominance.

The Penn men and women came in with differing expectations.

Looking to build on last year’s bronze finish, the men set their sights on loftier goals.

“As a team, we were tryinrystal Palace was close in the past.Michelangelo Minieri now expects Kouame to remain with the Viola long-term as he arrives from Genoa.He told Sky Italia: “Fiorentina has invested in a prospective and talented boy, it has been following him for someg to win the race. That was really it — just trying to win the race,” sophomore Anthony Russo said.

On the women’s side, the goal was to string together as many strong individual performances as possible to build momentum for the future.

“I think we just wanted to place as high as we could,” sophomore Danielle Orie said. “We wanted to have individual, good races collectively as a team. We weren’t expecting to win, we just wanted to do the best we could out there.”

While, expectations-wise, the men and women had their differences, in terms of strategy, the two squads took a similar approach to the race — that is, one that focused on maintaining a close distance to the front of the pack at a steady pace and start a move halfway to three-quarters through the race.

“Our aim was to stay in coondon for the foreseeable future with the in-form Frenchman aiming to secure a new contract at Chelsea.”Yes. Yes. Yeah, of course,” he told the Evening Standard. “There are a few months to go, games to win and maybe another trophy, and aftr Jaap Stam is backing their move for Ajax captain Matthijs de Ligt.The young defender is expected to announce his new club this week.Stam said, “I don’t know if it’s a possibility. But I can understand why United would want to sign him because he’er, you knontention for the first [4,000 meters] and then once we got halfway through the race, we had the mindset where it was like ‘okay, let’s be in there and when they make a move, be ready to go with it, grit it out, and see what happens,’” Russo said.

The weather played an important factor in the race. Orie, who lead the women with a 25th place finish, described the conditions as “crummy”; Russo simply said it “was not that great.”

Russo and senior Sam Webb led the way for the Quakers, placing 10th and 11th in the 8K race, respectively. Junior Aaron Groff and sophomore Alex Roth both finished in the top 20, and sophomore Daniel Cohen placed 36th to round out the Red and Blue’s top five.

Orie, a 2017 All-Ivy runner, finished in 25th place in the 6K. Juniors Maddie Villalba and Nia Akins came in at 32nd and 36th, respectively. Freshman Annie Zimmer and sophomore Melissa Tanaka composed the remainder of the top five, with finishes in the mid-to-late 40s.

Overall, while the athletes may not have gotten the results they had hoped for at this year’s Heps, there is still reason to be hopeful for the future. Of the top-five finishers from both the men’s and women’s teams, only one will be graduating next May.

“With the spirit we have, it’s not a matter of how many times we win, it’s a matter of how many times we are defeated and we stand up from it,” Orie said.

With leadership and wisdom like that, there is good reason to believe that the Quakers will be back in a big way at Heps next year.

What happens inside Penn Park's giant winter Bubble?

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During the late fall or early winter each year, one of Penn Park’s two turf fields seemingly disappears. While the James F. “Ace” Adams Field remains usable andving this season.Nainggolan left AS Roma for Inter last summer.“I was hoping that I could’ve done more for the team this season, but the team have done well, and we are close to our objective of qualifying for next season’s Champions League,” he to visible to the average Penn student, Dunning-Cohen Champions Field becomes enveloped in a colossal white structure known as “the Bubble.”

For many Penn students, the Bubble, or the “seasonal air structure” as it is described on the Penn Facilities website, is a mysterious, largely inaccessible dome. While varsity and club athletes alike utilize the Bubble to practice during the winter, most students are left to wonder about its contents.

A tour inside the Bubble led by Ian Lencicki, the building manager for Penn Athletics, revealed a well-lit, well-equipped structure with ample space for the Quakers’ athletic programs to conduct full practices during the freezing weather. With amenities such as soccer goals, lacrosse goals, netting, and batting cages, as well as electricity and controlled climate, the Bubble serves as an ideal place for teams that would otherwise be completely weather-dependent.

“From the time it goes up until the time it goes down, it’s utilized morning, noon, and night from 5:30 or 6:00 in the morning to sometimes 2:00 in the morning, with rental groups on the weekends,” Lencicki said. “We don’t have an indoor training space inside a field house or anything, so the Bubble gives our teams like baseball, softball, and lacrosse scrimmage advantages in the winter and early spring.”

A group of 40 to 50 electricians, groundsmen, and Penn Facilities managers orchestrate and conduct the installation and takedown of this massive structure. The process, as one might imagine, is complex and demanding.

The Bubble is usually erected around a week or two before Thanksgiving, and that process, according to Lencicki, can take up to three weeks.

“Typically around [late November], the soccer seasons are coming to an end, so there’s more field availability,” Lencicki said. “You’re not overlapping between soccer practices, lacrosse practices, and other field rentals.”

When first installed, the Bubble is totally bare and dark, with the lighting, electricity, security cameras, and then eventually the sporting equipment added in the following days.

The takedown process, although a much quicker process at only three or four days, can often be more complicated than installation, especially in terms of timing.

“We do takedown in late March, hopefully before or after any bad weather has rolled in,” Lencicki said. “We take it down allowing for rainy days because you can’t roll it up wet, or else it could get moldy, or dingy, or smelly. We need a really solid weather window, but we have to be careful not to run into Penn Relays, Spring Fling, and the other events that need these fields in the spring. It’s a really tight window.”

Still, despite the potential complications, the Bubble has proven itself to be a useful resource not only for Penn’s varsity and club programs but also for some other well-known teams.

According to Lencicki, the Bubble has housed the Philadelphia Union of the MLS, the Philadelphia Eagles of the NFL, and the United States Women’s National Soccer Team, among others, demonstrating a value that not only aids but also transcends Penn Athletics, a value that more than justifies the work that so many people do to make it possible.

A previous version of this article incorrectly spelled ‘Lencicki.’ The DP regream boss Jose Mourinho treated him before his departure.The Dane left Spurs last month in somewhat bitter circumstances.But on Mourinho, he insists: “He could have put me on the bench, but he didn’t. “After I Agnelli is in talks with Andrea Pirlo about a return.The former Juve midfielder is being lined up by Agnelli for a coaching role, reports Tuttosport.Pirlo has confirmed he’s been taking his UEFA coaching badges this year.Agnelli is happy to offer hiexplained my story to him, he said I shoults the error.

Princeton uses strong second half to pull away from Penn women's basketball

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It wasn’t supposed to go this way.

Coming off of two Ivy League victories, Penn women’s basketball hoped to secure another victory at the Palestra, this time against a Princeton team that the Red and Blue defeated . The Orange and Black, however, had other plans. Junior Bella Alarie, who put up 21 points in the last meeting between the schools, exploded for 33 points and 10 rebounds to help the visiting Tigers roll to a 68-53 win.

Despite a disappointing first quarter performance on the offensive end of the floor, Penn (18-5, 8-2 Ivy) was able to rely on characteristically solid defense to go into the first break trailing Princeton by just three points, 15-12.

When they were able to get shots off — the Quakers turned the ball over three times in the first period and struggled with shot clock awareness — they managed to hit at a 43 percent clip while holding their opponents to just 33 percent on 5-for-15 shooting.

Nevertheless, Princeton (16-9, 8-2) forced the Red and Blue into multiple tough, low-percentage shots. Senior forward Princess Aghayere’s early foul trouble made it difficult for Penn to establish an inside presence, and Alarie used all of her 6-foot-4 frame to cause problems in the paint for Penn’s Eleah Parker.

“[Alarie]’s too good,” coach Mike McLaughlin said. “You have to try to make her work and play in a crowd a little bit more. We didn’t do that enough and in the second half we gave up way too many breakdown lobs to her.”

After Alarie blocked Parker under the basket, the sophomore center responded minutes later on the other end of the court to start a back-and-forth battle that would continue for the rest of the half.

The second quarter saw the Tigers quickly extend their lead to eight, forcing Penn to take a timeout with 6:18 remaining in the half. Ever-determined, the Quakers clawed back, forcing four turnovers in the process, to cut the lead to 24-23 after junior guard Phoebe Sterba hit her first three-pointer of the game

For the rest of the quarter, both teams found ways to make shots; as the buzzer expired to end the first half, Parker missed a short floater and Penn went into the half trailing 33-31.

The second half did not start according to plan for the Red and Blue. Alarie score says te full-back’s proposed £11million move from Albion to Palace on January deadline day was called off after medical examinations revealed a torn meniscus.Ferguson had an operation to repair the knee this week and will be further assessed at thed the Tigers’ first eight points of the third quarter before Penn could get on the board. Another Princeton run extended the lead to 43-31 and McLaughlin called a timeout to allow his team to reset.

“They came at us in the second half, and I don’t know if we responded as well as we’re going to need to down the road,” McLaughlin said.

The Quakers went cold — they went just 6-for-21 from the field in the third quarter — but eight offensive rebounds in the quarter alone led to 10 second-chance points. Seniors Ashley Russell and Princess Aghayere contributed seven points apiece to trim the deficit 50-46 as the teams went into the last period of play.

For the fourth time on the evening, the Red and Blue started a quarter slowly. They opened with two consecutive shot clock violations while giving up two straight buckets to the visiting Tigers.

The Princeton lead grew to 10 points when Alarie again converted inside, forcing Penn into a timeout with 6:05 remaining on the clock.

The Quakers tried everything to stop Alarie in the second half; they rotated Parker and Aghayere in addition to giving minutes to sophomore forward Tori Crawford and junior center Emily Anderson against Princeton’s star. When other Tigers stepped up — sophomore guard Carlie Littlefield converted a four-point play to take an 11-point lead with 5:32 left to play — the game’s result was all but determined.

“To beat a quality opponent, you have to be reallDembele.Manchester United and PSG have been linked with Dembele this week.But Cardoner told Catalunya Ràdio: “Dembélé is a different player, surprising, when we face him, you never know where he will go. He brings a very important element to the ty good in all areas,” McLaughlin said. “I don’t think that was the case tonight.”

Next up for the Red and Blue is a Friday evening home matchup with Harvard (14-9, 7-3), where Penn will look to rebound against a team to whom it on Feb. 16.

Parker had a double-double last time out against the Crimson, but she knows that there’s much to improve before the Red and Blue return to the Palestra.

“We played a tough one against Harvard last time, to get carried with his superb season so far.The Uruguayan midfielder has risen to prominence with Los Blancos of late, but he’s a quiet personality off the pitch.”I’m shy, I always try to respect people’s space, but I try to enjoy myself to the fulso we’re going to focus on our shooting and ways to score on offense,” Parker said. “We struggled from the perimeter, so we should pick that up, and definitely defense. That’s what we’re going to take away from this game for sure.”

The Quakers also play Saturday against Dartmouth (12-11, 5-5). They already hold a over the Big Green this season and will look to revisit that success.

Penn wrestling resumes dual meet season with 25-18 comeback loss to Duke

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The winter break grind continues for Penn wrestling.

The Quakers traveled south to Duke this weekend, jumping back into the dual meet season for 2019. Despite a promising start to the match with wins in the 125- and 133-pound weight classes, the Red and Blue ultimately fell by a score of 25-18.

Penn (1-2) opened the meet with a shutout by freshman Carmen Ferrante at 125 pounds. Ferrante secured just over three minutes of riding time by the end of the second period and won the match in a technical fall with a score of 15-0, contributing five team points to the Quakers’ tally.

After Duke (1-0) forfeited the 133-pound match, Penn’s lead li coach Carlo Ancelotti and his players blanked the media after last night’s Champions League draw with RB Salzburg.Ancelotti refused to speak to the media and abandoned his contractually-obligated press conference.It’s also emerged the players are was up to 11. Next, freshman Grant Aronoff faced the first of four brothers competing for Duke this weekend, freshman Josh Finesilver, at 141 pounds. This match, which each respective head coach acknowledged as a key matchup before the meet, allowed Duke to puthe Major League Soccer (MLS) expansion team part-owned by David Beckham, have unveiled a long-term omnichannel retail partnership with apparel and merchandise giant Fanatics, reports, /.The deal will see Fanatics manage all in-venue retail operationt its first four team points on the board as Finesilver won by major decision, 14-6.

Fellow freshman and No. 17 Anthony Artalona faced the next Finesilver brother, redshirt senior and No. 6 Mitch, at 149 pounds. The pair met earlier this season in the semifinals of the the , where Artalona fell 5-2.

With these two top-20 competitors battling it out again this weekend, the low-scoring match saw its fepared to punish Manchester City if they’re found guilty of breaking financial football laws.Reports last week suggested City may face a Champions League ban if found guilty with UEFA referring the case to Club Financial Control Body adjudicatory chairst takedown in the last 45 seconds of the final period by Finesilver. Mitch Finesilver ultimately defeated Artalona 4-1, earning three team points for Duke and cutting Penn’s lead to 11-7.

Senior Joe Oliva, a three-time team captain for the Quakers, competed at 157 pounds. Oliva, who entered the meet with four losses by just two points or fewer this season, finally got over the hump to deliver his first team points of the year, winning a major decision over Benjamin Anderson by a score of 13-5 and pushing Penn’s lead to 15-7.

At 165 pounds, the third Finesilver brother, sophomore Zach, wrestled Penn sophomore Evan DeLuise. The matchup started out close, as DeLuise led after an early takedown and secured over a minute of riding time. DeLuise’s offensive aggression continued as he led going into the final period, repeatedly shooting first and making offensive advances.

However, the Finesilvers improved to 3-0 on the day when Zach earned four back points at the buzzer to erase DeLuise’s riding time, edging ahead 12-8 and trimming Penn’s lead to 15-10.

A victory followed for the fourth Finesilver brother, Matt, who beat junior Brian Krasowski at 174 pounds by technical fall in a 17-1 win which included five minutes and 29 seconds of riding time. At this point, with the meet tied at 15, the Finesilver brothers had contributed all the team points on the board for Duke.

Duke won the two matches, at 184 and 197 pounds by a major decision and a pin, respectively, to add on 10 team points and make the score 25-15 in favor of the home team.

In the last matchup, between freshman Ben Goldin and Duke’s Araad Fisher, Penn won three more team points as Goldin won by a 5-2 decision. However, the Quakers were unable to dig out of their 10-point deficit, and the meet ended with a 25-18 Duke victory.

The Quakers will hope to bounce back from the loss when they face University City foe Drexel on Jan. 13 at the Palestra.